Month: August 2014

Game board

How Do You (Successfully) Gamify a Course?

Some people say college is already a game — but a poorly designed one. Political scientist Mika LaVaque-Manty is bringing game logic into his introductory courses, a winning effort that was honored at this year’s APSA annual conference.

5 years ago
80
Danger sign

The Risks–Both Serious and Subtle–of Fieldwork

Amiera Sawas writes here on her experiences with risks in the field and beyond, finding that institutional protocols are undoubtedly robust on a wide range of physical threats, but more subtle threats, like sexual harassment, which cross psychological and physical lines, are not always explicitly dealt with.

5 years ago
65
IndyRef game

Methods: In Polling, Bigger Is Not Necessarily Better

As various canvasses and opinion polls attempt to predict the outcome of the Scottish independence plebiscite, it’s worth taking a look at how more methodologically sound inputs lead to more accurate forecasts.

5 years ago
38
Research & Politics logo

My Experiences Launching an Open Access Journal

While preparing for a panel on the subject at APSA this week, political scientist Erik Voeten looks over the launch of the open access and peer-reviewed journal ‘Research & Politics’ and discusses the opportunities and challenges of this kind of publishing.

5 years ago
22
Slippery slope roadsign

The Slippery Slope: Dumbing Down into Secondary Schools

Although this piece first posted at The Conversation was not intended as a response to Daniel Nehring’s request for opinions about effect of ranking-mania on academic labor, Alister Scott’s observations on the current state of British higher education do shine a light on one facet of the larger issues involved.

5 years ago
83
Mark Hager

Engaging With the Untidy World of Nonprofits

What’s the best for a professional association to build engagement from its members? For one thing, notes Mark Hager in an award-winning paper, you probably can put away the souvenir tote bags.

5 years ago
35
Guardian sociology rankings 2014

What Do Academia’s Ubiquitous Rankings Accomplish?

Why does it matter whether you study or work at the sociology department that comes first, 12th or 89th in a ranking? Why does it matter whether the journal you publish in is included and ranked in a certain index, or not? Let us know your thoughts.

5 years ago
38
Open access buttons

An Open Invitation to OpenCon

Nick Shockey highlights OpenCon, a conference to take place in November aimed at mobilizing support around open access, open educational resources and open data among early career researchers. Funding has been made available to cover travel to attend the conference in Washington, D.C. but the deadline is Monday.

5 years ago
21
Steven Salaita

L’affaire Salaita: Can Activism Go a Tweet Too Far?

Social media allows scholars to discuss and debate current affairs like never before, but on a very public stage. Brent E. Sasley and Mira Sucharov examine and assess one academic’s tweets on the Israel-Gaza crisis and the questions raised over his style and approach.

5 years ago
22
Kristin Beck

Taking the Air out of the Ban on Transgender Troops

UPDATE: In a 2014 article, a former U.S. surgeon general and four co-authors argue that the U.S. military’s medically based ban on transgender troops in place then failed on the facts and on the precedents of other populations in uniform.

5 years ago
39
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