Month: September 2018

Crowd-Sourcing As a Complement to Peer Review

A new process developed by Princeton’s Matthew Salganik for reviewing academic manuscripts allows the world at large to examine and weigh in on a book at the same time the manuscript is undergoing peer review.

3 years ago
1045

How a Degree in Humanities Can Help in a Disruptive Economy

A report from RBC Royal Bank reaffirms what thought leaders keep insisting — there will be more and more demand for a liberal arts education in our increasingly digital world. “I prefer to call them “essential skills,” because we all need them every day, though we don’t always use them well. They are the foundational skills that allow us to learn and live and work productively with other people.”

3 years ago
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Author Gateway Banner

How Should I Approach Reviewing an Article?

Most early career researchers receive little to no training on how to peer review, and it’s not always easy to find consistent or helpful guidance. Here, during Peer Review Week, Katrina Newitt offers some helpful advice on how to get started.

3 years ago
545
Social Science news bulletin

Washington and Social Science: NSF Funding Not Part of Fast-Tracked Bills

The US Senate approved a “minibus” appropriations bill that combined the FY19 Defense and Labor-Health and Human Services-Education Appropriations Acts. The Senate also cleared for the president’s signature the FY19 Defense Authorization Act, and the measure was signed into law on August 13. But the bill that includes NSF funding has gone nowhere.

3 years ago
539

How Will Universities Cope With Brexit Britain’s Resurgent Nationalism?

As Brexit Britain appears headed straight for a chaotic exit from the European Union, its universities are raising questions about their future with growing alarm. The consequences which post-Brexit nationalism will have for universities, students, and scholars are hardly being discussed at all.

3 years ago
609
Sheila Jasanoff_rect

Jasanoff to Receive SSRC’s Hirschman Award

Sheila Sen Jasanoff, the founder and director of Harvard University’s Program on Science, Technology and Society, will receive the Social Science Research Council’s highest honor, the Albert O. Hirschman Prize, and deliver the Hirschman lecture — “Theory, Critique, and Discipline in a Post-Truth Age” — on November 30

3 years ago
957
Martin Shubik

The Well-Rounded Game Theorist: Martin Shubik, 1926-2018

Martin Shubik, an economist,  game theorist and political scientist whose sense of persepctive, and of humor, infused his voluminous work on complex and vexing questions, has died at age 92. He died August 22 at his home in Branford, Connecticut; Shubik had been on the faculty at nearby Yale University since 1963.

3 years ago
1608
Diane Reay

Diane Reay on Education and Class

One thing has become clear to sociologist Diane Reay across her research – “It’s primarily working-class children who turn out to be losers in the educational system.” Whether it’s through the worst-funded schools, least-qualified teachers, most-temporary teaching arrangements or narrowest curricula, students from working class backgrounds in the United Kingdom (and the United States) draw the shortest educational straws.

3 years ago
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