Month: April 2019

Rosa Daiger von Gleichen

Working relationships: An ESRC Better Lives Essay

In this shortlisted essay from the ESRC Better Lives Writing Competition, in which PhD students who have received money from the ESRC write short essays about how their research leads too better lives, new mother Rosa Daiger von Gleichen describes the exertions required to both work and be a parent. The PhD candidate in social policy at the University of Oxford studies employer-based and public family policies, primarily in the United Kingdom, the United States and Germany, to understand how employers, families and individuals will manage both work and care in the future.

2 years ago
350

NASEM Partnership Awards

The Rita Allen Foundation, and NASEM are offering awards to support the formation and development of collaborative researcher–practitioner partnerships. To apply for these awards, submit a joint proposal that describes the rationale for your partnership. Apply by July 1st.

2 years ago
351
Elyse Couch

Building a better life with dementia: An ESRC Better Lives Essay

Before she studied psychology and mental care services, Elyse Couch worked as care worker for people with dementia — experiences which serve her well as she now investigates the use of health services following a diagnosis of dementia or mild cognitive impairment. In this shortlisted essay from the ESRC Better Lives Writing Competition, in which PhD students who have received money from the ESRC write short essays about how their research leads too better lives, the King’s College London student describes one particular person with dementia she worked with and how that experience highlights many aspects that follow a dementia diagnosis.

2 years ago
305

Thoughts on Gender in the 21st Century University Environment

In May 2017 a small band of researchers at Bournemouth University organized a workshop on “Gender and Sexuality in the 21st Century.” The participants’ openness to a discussion on sexuality, gender, and emotion began to expose this latest generation’s “ambivalence,” even “dissonance,” regarding concepts such as “gender” and “sexuality.”

2 years ago
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Whatever Happened to Conservative Social Thought?

In the wake of Brexit, Robert Dingwall asks a series of probing questions about the eclipse of Conservative Social Thought at universities, such as when did the social sciences last have a serious engagement with the institutions of the bourgeoisie, even though by income and status many of us would belong to that class?

2 years ago
621

Might Campus Free Speech Laws Muzzle Some Speech?

Some language in campus speech legislation may be largely symbolic and not change what many colleges are already doing. But, argues Neal Hutchens, some provisions in legislation could change campus speech rules in important ways.

2 years ago
232

What’s the Best Day to Submit an Academic Article?

Large data sets can now be quickly analyzed to assess whether or not certain features, previously deemed unimportant, can actually affect the chances of a research paper being accepted for publication. In this post, James Hartley looks at new research on weekly submission dates.

2 years ago
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Library Collections a Treasure Trove for Social Science Research

WorldCat, an aggregate database of library catalogs worldwide, was primarily set up to aid libraries in carrying out their work in areas such as cataloging or resource sharing. Brian Lavoie offers an insight into the types of questions WorldCat data can provide answers to, and how research of this kind also amplifies the value and impact of library collections.

2 years ago
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Holly Chalcraft

This Land Is My Land: An ESRC Better Lives Essay

In this shortlisted essay from the ESRC Better Lives Writing Competition, in which PhD students who have received money from the ESRC write short essays about how their research leads too better lives, anthropologist Holly Chalcraft from Durham University discusses how the ethnic swap between Greece and Turkey after World War I affects self-identity today.

2 years ago
623

What’s That? The Replication Crisis is Good for Science?

The ‘replication crisis’ certainly is uncomfortable for many scientists whose work gets undercut, and the rate of failures may currently be unacceptably high. But psychologist and statistician Eric Loken argues that confronting the replication crisis is good for science as a whole.

2 years ago
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Second PIBBS cover

Susan Fiske Connects Policy and Research in Print

Psychologist Susan Fiske was the founding editor of the journal Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences. In trying to reach a lay audience with research findings that matter, she counsels stepping a bit outside your academic comfort zone.

2 years ago
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Measuring sticks

Can We Use Altmetrics to Measure Societal Impact?

In this post, Lutz Bornmann and Robin Haunschild present evidence from their recent study examining the relationship of peer review, altmetrics, and bibliometric analyses with societal and academic impact. Drawing on evidence from REF2014 submissions, they argue altmetrics may provide evidence for wider non-academic debates, but correlate poorly with peer review assessments of societal impact.

2 years ago
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