Month: June 2019

Textbook Authorship: The Joys of a Crazy Undertaking

“Writing a textbook,” says Tom Heinzen, “is a foolish idea.” It’s an enormous undertaking and the rewards a few. But there are some rewards, and Heinzen and Wind Goodfriend, the authors of the new intro textbook ‘Social Psychology,’ are reaping one of them: their book received a Most Promising New Textbook Award from the Textbook & Academic Authors Association, or TAA.

2 years ago
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How to Make Your Networks a Force for Good

Social media manipulation is tearing societies apart – but it can help put us back together again. Michael Sanders teaches us how to change the narrative of social media so that it can be a source for “Good.”

2 years ago
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Share Your Social Science Story

COSSA is calling for the social science community to submit stories of social sciences successes, whether it be advances in research, an example of how social science is being used effectively in your community, an educational experience or teacher who shaped the trajectory of your social science career.

2 years ago
268

Leon Redbone, Fact Checking, and Ethnography

In recent popular music, there have been few if any performers as enigmatic as the late Leon Redbone, who died on May 30. With a vintage repertoire featuring tunes from ragtime, blues, vaudeville, and Tin Pan Alley, and always appearing in dark glasses and a Panama hat, he looked like a figure straight out of the 1920s.

2 years ago
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Sam Friedman

Sam Friedman on Class

“Education,” says sociologist Sam Friedman, “doesn’t wash away the effects of class background in terms of allocating opportunities. That’s quite profound – I believe there are a lot of people who believe quite strongly that these sorts of educational institutions can and do act as sort of meritocratic sorting houses.”

2 years ago
5663

Sci-Hub: The Librarian’s Response

In this post by Ruth Harrison, Yvonne Nobis & Charles Oppenheim they tell about the challenges that Sci-Hub presents to librarians who are advocating for open access to scholarly content. We published this post in recognition of lasts weeks Open Access Week around the country. The article highlights issues associated with open access and scholarly communications and the views reflect that of the authors.

2 years ago
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Slavers and traders inspect slave

Understanding the Slave Trade

Our Robert Dingwall says he has long thought that sociologists should read more history. It might correct some of their sweeping generalizations about the emergence and development of Western societies. This reflection has been reinforced by a recent book, ‘A Fistful of Shells: West Africa from the Rise of the Slave Trade to the Age of Revolution.’

2 years ago
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