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Social Isolation Amid COVID: An Excerpt from ‘Together Apart’

They had been sentenced, for an unknown crime, to an indeterminate period of punishment. (Camus, 1947) As Albert Camus observed […]

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Social Science ‘Spinouts,’ An Underappreciated Pathway to Impact?

One means of fixing and making ideas tangible, often scorned and neglected in the social sciences, but widely used in STEM, are spinouts. For universities, a spinout is a company formed on the basis of intellectual property from a university or research institute.

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Minerva Initiative Seems Likely to Avoid Untimely Death

In early February, the proposed U.S. government budget for the 2021 fiscal year featured sizable funding cuts to many federally […]

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Risk Perception Amid COVID: An Excerpt from ‘Together Apart’

Patient A1.1, who was then still experiencing mild respiratory symptoms, attended a birthday party with nine other people. They hugged […]

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Group Threat and COVID: An Excerpt from ‘Together Apart’

The biggest threat to the Territory is clear. It is not us, it’s them. Western Australian Premier Mark McGowan We live in […]

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Raoult and Einstein

Why the h-index is a Bogus Measure of Academic Impact

Although experts in bibliometry have pointed out the dubious nature of the h-index, most researchers do not always seem to understand that its properties make it a far-from-valid index to seriously and ethically assess the quality or scientific impact of publications.

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Why Social Science? Because We Will Need to Do Better in the Next Crisis

Without research in social, organizational, and behavioral sciences, argues John Haaga, as serious as the investment in biomedical research, the United States may be no better off when the next acute crisis hits.

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Changing Perspectives; Changing Views: COVID and Agile Organizations

Chris Worley, professor of organizational theory and management at Pepperdine University’s Graziadio Business School, and Claudy Jules, the head Google’s Center of Expertise on Organizational Health and Change, offer context behind their commentary, “COVID-19’s Uncomfortable Revelations About Agile and Sustainable Organizations in a VUCA World,” in the Journal of Applied Behavioral Science.

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Coronavirus UK – Understanding the UK Government’s Policy on COVID-19

The UK government has regularly been denounced by many in the public health community for its absence of strategy in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic. Much of this criticism, however, reflects a simple dislike of the strategy or of the government that has authored it. On closer inspection, the UK government does have an intellectually coherent position – just one that is different from that preferred by many public health specialists and activists, and, to some extent, the biomedical community in general.

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Might Commercializing Social Science Be a Road to Impact?

As the world emerges from the COVID-19 lockdown many opportunities have arisen to rethink how and for whom our societies operate. In this post, Julia Black argues that social sciences can play a unique role in the post-COVID-19 recovery by forging new relationships with business and commerce and outlines how initiatives, such as the Aspect network, are seeking to bridge the divide between the social sciences and business.

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Virtual Festival of Higher Education Looks at British HE post-COVID

The University of Buckingham, in association with the Higher Education Policy Institute, in bringing the fifth festival of Higher Education […]

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Lucius Barker

A Giant in Mentoring Political Leaders: Lucius Barker, 1928-2020

Political scientist Lucius Barker, a pioneering African-American academic whose influence in fields like constitutional law and civil liberties has been amplified by the high-profile leaders he mentored, died on June 21. He was 92.

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Ethics word cloud by Teodoraturovic

Academic Freedom Includes the Responsibility to Act Ethically

Academic freedom is only one wing by which the academy flies, says Jimi Adesina. The other is the duty of scholars to act ethically and responsibly.

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Seeing Social Science Bites Podcasts in a New Way​​

Since its debut in 2012, the Social Science Bites podcast series every month has brought the voices of the world’s top social and behavioral researchers to the wider world. Looking over that body of work, we realized that mating sound with vision made excellent sense, and so enlisted scientific illustrator Alex Cagan to bring a select number of our podcasts to life via his pen.

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A 12-Step Program for Decolonizing the University: Free Webinar

In this free one-hour webinar, public sociologist Rodney Coates, professor of global and intercultural studies and coordinator for Black World Studies at Miami University, Ohio, will outline his 12 steps for accomplishing decolonization on the university.

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Gurminder K. Bhambra on Postcolonial Social Science

In this Social Science Bites podcast, Gurminder K. Bhambra discusses with interviewer David Edmonds why we should speak about the Haitian revolution in the same breath as the contemporaneous American and French revolutions, how former empires conveniently forget the contributions of their colonies now that those empires have downgraded to mere ‘nations,’ and what lessons we should draw from the current iconoclastic impulse toward imperial statuary.

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In Defense of the Edited Collection

Edited collections, are one of the most disparaged forms of academic writing, often written off as low quality, or a poor career choice. In contrast, Peter Webster argues for the unique benefit of edited collections, as a creative form of collective academic endeavor that does not sit easily within an academy that is averse to creative risk.

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H1B visa

Integrating Newcomers: Studying the Socialization of Skilled Migrants

Quite often discussions about skilled migrants center on the receiving country’s reaction to the migrants, rather than the experiences of the migrants themselves. In this article from the Journal of Management, Phyllis Tharenou, vice president and executive dean of the College of Business, Government and Law of Flinders University, and Carol T. Kulik, a research professor of human resource management at the University of South Australia Business School, address this absence specifically in the academic management literature.

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A Simple Model Shows Value of Common COVID Defenses

The author’s team at the Goldenson Center for Actuarial Research has developed a free, user-friendly computer model that demonstrates how infections and deaths progress on a daily basis over a three-month period depending on how people behave in response to the outbreak.

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Ann Cheney with clinic staff

COVID Can Change How We See and Use Research

In the wake of COVID-19, researchers can become trusted figures of authority who can purposely use their institutional privilege and re-appropriate their research networks, skills and knowledge to better the lives of vulnerable populations during a pandemic.

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Free Webinar on Switching to Online Teaching

In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, many universities around the world switched to online teaching and remote learning both at […]

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Reading fake news on tablet

10 Tips for Spotting Misinformation Online

It’s tempting to blame bots and trolls for spreading misinformation. But really it’s our own fault for sharing so widely. Research has confirmed that lies spread faster than truth – mainly because lies are not bound to the same rules as truth.

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Marni Brown quote

The Importance of Cultural and Social Awareness in Building LGBTQI Families

Marni Brown found herself pondering, “Why does race matter in this selection process and why do lesbians, in general, want their offspring to look like them? Is the desire for our children to look like us actuality a cover-up for racially driven decisions that perpetuate inequality in already marginalized communities?”

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Yale’s James Scott to Receive SSRC’s Hirschman Prize

Political scientist and anthropologist James C. Scott, co-director of the Agrarian Studies Program at Yale University and a self-described “mediocre farmer,” has received the 2020 Albert O. Hirschman Prize from the Social Science Research Council.

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The Price of ‘Paying Your Debt to Society’ Extends Well Beyond Incarceration

here’s a fact Cynthia Golembeski learned while researching criminal justice reform and teaching college classes in prisons: the reason the transition to life outside the corrections system is so hard is that there are more than 44,000 indirect consequences of a criminal conviction.

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