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Sign: "Ubefyrwdeehe"

The Monotony of Transcription: Who’s Revolutionizing the Process?

Transcribing can be a pain, and although recent progress in speech recognition software has helped, it remains a challenge. Speech recognition programs, do, however, raise ethical/consent issues: what if person-identifiable interview data is transcribed or read by someone who was not given the consent to do so? Furthermore, some conversational elements aren’t transcribed well by pattern recognition programs.

2 months ago
591
Chocolate Factory

A Personal History of ‘Human Relations,’ With Chocolate

‘Henry Riley: A Personal History of Human Relations’ frames the seven decades of The Tavistock Institute’s journal ‘Human Relations’ against key moments in one man’s ordinary life and how those moments are reflected through seminal articles published in the journal.

2 years ago
178
Karenza Moore

Karenza Moore on Dance Culture

Sociologist has studied the dance club scene — think of the lamented Fabric nightclub as a cultural touchstone — for years as a ‘participant observer.’ In this Social Science Bites podcast she talks about the scene’s obvious drug use and the mechanics of doing ethnography at a rave.

3 years ago
293
Emile Durkheim

Steven Lukes on Durkheim

In this Social Science Bites podcast, social theorist Steven Lukes tells interviewer Nigel Warburton how Émile Durkheim’s exploration of issues like labor, suicide and religion proved intriguing to a young academic and enduring for an established one.

5 years ago
1086
C Wright Mills

John Brewer on C. Wright Mills

C. Wright Mills was one of the most important sociologists of the 20th century. He believed that sociology could change people’s lives, and that sociologists, far from being neutral, should help bring about such change, and his ideas would fuel ‘60s counter-culture. In this Social Science Bites podcast, John Brewer reveals the full man behind the icon.

5 years ago
1033
Erving Goffman

Peter Lunt on Erving Goffman

Erving Goffman has been called the most influential American sociologist of the 20th century thanks to his study of the social interactions of everyday life. In this Social Science Bites podcast, social psychologist Peter Lunt discusses his own inquiries into Goffman and how he approached his subjects with “an ethnographer’s eye.”

5 years ago
387

Trevor Marchand on Craft

It’s an unusual approach for an academic: a hands-on approach. Literally a hands-on approach. Trevor Marchand is an anthropologist interested in how information about crafts is transferred from expert to novice. This has led him to Nigeria, Yemen, Mali, and East London …

5 years ago
345
Linda Woodhead detail

Linda Woodhead on the New Sociology of Religion

Religiosity has changed for the majority of populations in Britain and the West, and so a new kind of way to study it must arise. In this Social Science Bites podcast, Linda Woodhead discusses the new sociology required to study this nuanced spiritual landscape, and what some of the implications are on the secular world.

5 years ago
286
Ivor Crewe interviewed by Dave Edmonds

Ivor Crewe on Psephology

In this episode of the Social Science Bites podcast series, political scientist Ivor Crewe, the current president of Britain’s Academy of Social sciences and the master of Oxford’s University College, discusses the modern art, and sometime science, of election polling.

5 years ago
563
Saskia Sassen with Nigel Warburton

Saskia Sassen on Before Method

Here’s an idea: social scientists should reflect critically on the prevailing concepts and categories before launching into empirical work with an existing framework. In this episode of the Social Science Bites podcast, urban sociologist Saskia Sassen discusses that concept, called “before method,” with Nigel Warburton.

6 years ago
267
Greg Clark

Gregory Clark on Names

What’s in a name? According to economist Gregory Clark, a lot of divine-able information about your family’s past and perhaps a fair bit about your children’s future. In the latest edition of Social Science Bites, David Edmonds talks with Clark about his at-times controversial examination of surnames and their nexus with social mobility.

6 years ago
449
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