Bookshelf

Book Review: Higher Education and Social Inequalities

The higher education system rests on the principle of meritocracy, with entry into the ‘top’ Russell Group universities supposedly the product of ability. This is despite growing attention to the over-representation of independent school students studying at the ‘top’ universities, with state school students and disadvantaged groups less likely to secure admission.

6 days ago
241
Various arrows

Sizing Up a ‘One Size Does Not Fit All’ Mass Media

If you were going to create an encyclopedia about “mass media,” your first task likely would be to define both words in the term. Doing so was immeasurably easier in the 1920s, when the term “mass media” first started making the rounds, but it’s grown corresponding harder as both the popular conception of ‘mass’ has mutated and the very media itself has evolved from purely paper to heavily broadcast to OMG online.

2 weeks ago
337

Book Review: Writing a Watertight Thesis

How you structure the thesis itself is only one part of the overall structure of your doctorate. In their new book, Mike Bottery and Nigel Wright discuss the importance of three different areas in which a good structure is crucial to your success…

3 weeks ago
405
Credibility puzzle

Why Faith in Science Is Critical: Five Questions for Naomi Oreskes

Science journalist Hope Reese speaks with Naomi Oreskes, author of the new book ‘Why Trust Science?’ about how to trust science that may conflict with our moral or religious values and what we can do to prevent bias in scientific communities, and methodological fetishism, among other topics.

1 month ago
328
Slow Professor book cover

In Praise of Becoming a ‘Slow Professor’

After a friend gave the reviewer a copy of ‘The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy’ by Maggie Berg and Barbara K. Seeber, it gave him lots of food for thought: Working at a university, after several years of postdoctoral fellowships, why, indeed, not slow down?

3 months ago
609

Opening the Door to Allow All Truly Gifted Students Entry

Joni Lakin takes a look at David Lohman’s seminal 2005 work in Gifted Child Quarterly. His paper addresses the issue of underrepresentation while tackling a well-intentioned myth that nonverbal tests are the most equitable way to assess students who come from racial, ethnic, or linguistic minorities in the U.S.

4 months ago
234

Writing Social Science Fiction in the Age of the Metrix

Burned out by the hamster-wheel of academe and the regime of metrics, John Postill decided the tonic would be to write a spoof spy thriller about a Spanish nerd with a silly name who moves to London in 1994 and accidentally foils a terrorist plot by an evil anthropologist.

5 months ago
241

HEPI Offers Clarion Call to Protect Free Speech on Campus

Concerns that free speech is being on university campuses, at least in the United Kingdom, are overblown, with the biggest threat originating not on campuses but from the government and its Prevent program. That’s a key takeaway in a new paper from Britain’s Higher Education Policy Institute, Free Speech and Censorship on Campus.

6 months ago
125

The Politician in the Pocket

David Canter reviews The Handbook of Organised Crime and Politics. Its crucial findings drawn from across studies in Europe, the Americas and South East Asia, is that in many places politicians benefit from the support of criminal organisations. In turn those organisations require the backing of politicians.

6 months ago
120

Learning to Communicate Social Responsibility

While ”corporate social responsibility’ is a staple of conversations in the business world, CSR isn’t necessarily on the lips of those outside the boardroom. That guided Janis Teruggi Page and Lawrence J. Parnell as they wrote the new intro to strategic public relations textbook. That message must have resonated, since the TAA honored the book with one of its Most Promising New Textbook Awards.

6 months ago
118
Resume and race

Can Academic Research be a Force for Good?

The greatest value of research is the positive impact it has on society. In this first blog post from a series looking at seminal academic articles from the SAGE Inspire collection, the editor of ‘Administrative Science Quarterly’ talks about a key 2016 piece on ‘whitening résumés.’

6 months ago
552
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