Business and Management INK

China’s Economic Transformation

October 19, 2010 695

Dic Lo, Department of Economics, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, talks about his and co-author, Yu Zhang, Renmin University of China, article,  ” Making Sense of China’s Economic Transformation” recently published in OnlineFirst of the Review of Radical Political Economics.

Who is the target audience for this article?

“Economists and social scientists interested in China and development – including university/college teachers and students, and commercial-sector economists.”

What Inspired You To Be Interested In This Topic?

“This topic is of central importance to world development of our times, and my first and foremost motivation is intellectual curiosity.”

Were There Findings That Were Surprising To You?

“Yes, the findings suggest/indicate a reality that is fundamentally different from that of the dominant views of the (scholarly and journalistic) literature.”

How Do You See This Study Influencing Future Research And/Or Practice?

“I believe future research will need to take into account of the complexities and subtleties of the reality as revealed by the study.”

How Does This Study Fit Into Your Body Of Work/Line Of Research?

“This study is a synthesis of the main body of my research work over the past 20 years.”

How Did Your Paper Change During The Review Process?

“The paper was initially written in a style that is exceedingly narrative; this revised version is much more analytical and rigorous.”

What, If Anything, Would You Do Differently If You Could Go Back And Do This Study Again?

“Subsequent research (esp. on the role of finance in Chinese economic transformation) has reinforced the main propositions of the study, and has opened up new, important issues for further investigation.”

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