Business and Management INK

Why Submit Your Manuscript to O&E?

July 19, 2011 827

Organization & Environment (O&E), recognized as a leading international journal of ecosocial research unique in its emphasis on organizations, institutions, and nature, publishes quarterly peer-reviewed research that sets new standards for interdisciplinary thinking about our complex, hazardous, and increasingly unpredictable biosphere and its social dimensions.

Here are five reasons to submit your manuscript to O&E for review:

1. Your manuscript will be reviewed by the world’s top experts in organizational and managerial studies of the natural environment, environmental sociology, and environmental philosophy. These scholars are genuinely concerned about environmental problems and issues and sympathetic to the difficulties of publishing work on these topics in the traditional disciplines. 

2. Your manuscript will receive quick and careful handling by O&E’s editors. Once your manuscript is accepted for publication, normally it will be published within 6 months and often it will be available online even sooner. O&E is on a 16 week production schedule, so we can say that it normally will be published within 4 months.

3. O&E is abstracted and indexed in all major scholarly databases.

4. O&E has a citation impact statistic for published work that is on par with many outstanding environmental journals in business studies, sociology, and philosophy.

O&E’s 2010 Two-Year Impact Factor is 1.085 and is ranked 43 out of 77 in Environmental Studies.

O&E’s Five-Year Impact Factor is 1.377 and is ranked 40 out of 77 in Environmental Studies.

5. O&E and SAGE Publications will feature the authors of selected articles in podcasts widely available on iTunes and other sources and will make each published article available free to 10 scholars nominated by the author of the article.

In one such podcast, Rebecca Henn, Ph.D. student at University of Michigan, talks with Andrew J. Hoffman, University of Michigan, about his article, “Talking Past Each Other? Cultural Framing of Skeptical and Convinced Logics in the Climate Change Debate.”

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Business and Management INK puts the spotlight on research published in our more than 100 management and business journals. We feature an inside view of the research that’s being published in top-tier SAGE journals by the authors themselves.

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