Social Science Bites

George Loewenstein on Hot and Cold Affect
Insights
February 1, 2022

George Loewenstein on Hot and Cold Affect

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Joel Mokyr on Economic Lessons from the Past
Social Science Bites
January 10, 2022

Joel Mokyr on Economic Lessons from the Past

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Karin Barber on Verbal Arts
Social Science Bites
December 3, 2021

Karin Barber on Verbal Arts

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Melanie Simms on Work
Social Science Bites
November 1, 2021

Melanie Simms on Work

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Jeffrey Ian Ross on Convict Criminology

Jeffrey Ian Ross on Convict Criminology

Jeffrey Ian Ross, a professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Baltimore, is one of the originators of the concept of ‘convict criminology.’

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Molefi Kete Asante on Afrocentrism

Molefi Kete Asante on Afrocentrism

In this Social Science Bites podcast, Molefi Kete Asante offers an insiders view of the growth of the Afrocentric paradigm, from the founding of the Journal of Black Studies a half century ago to the debates over critical race theory today.

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Jennifer Richeson on Perceptions of Racial Inequality

Jennifer Richeson on Perceptions of Racial Inequality

There is inequality in the United States, a fact most people accept and which data certainly bears out. But how bad do you think that inequality is, say, based on comparing the wealth held by the average Black person in America and the average white person?

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Jennifer Lee on Asian Americans

Jennifer Lee on Asian Americans

The twin prods of a U.S. president trying to rebrand the coronavirus as the ‘China virus’ and a bloody attack in Atlanta that left six Asian women dead have brought to the fore a spate of questions about Asian Americans in the United States.
Sociologist Jennifer Lee is answering those questions.

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Martha Newson on Identity Fusion

Martha Newson on Identity Fusion

Martha Newson, linked to the universities of Oxford and Kent, describes how fans of football often fuse their own identities into a tightly bonded group (even as they retain their individuality).

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Olivier Sibony on Decision-Making

Olivier Sibony on Decision-Making

In the context of human action, management professor at HEC Paris and former McKinsey senior partner Olivier Sibony defines “noise” as the unwanted variability in human judgment.

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Whose Work Most Influenced You? Part 4: A Social Science Bites Retrospective

Whose Work Most Influenced You? Part 4: A Social Science Bites Retrospective

In this montage drawn from the last two years of Social Science Bites podcasts, interviewer David Edmonds poses the same question to 25 notable social scientists: Whose work most influenced your own?

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Jim Scott on Resistance

Jim Scott on Resistance

When Jim Scott mentions ‘resistance,’ this recovering political scientist isn’t usually talking about grand symbolic statements or large-scale synchronized actions by thousands or more battling an oppressive state. He’s often referring to daily actions by average people, often not acting in concert and perhaps not even seeing themselves as ‘resisting’ at all.

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