Communication

Quirk Theory – Why Outsiders Thrive After High School

May 10, 2011 2312

A new book by Alexandra Robbins looks at social science research about what ‘popularity’ means, why cliques rule schools and how individual kids navigate their social subcultures.

In an interview on LiveScience, the author talks about ‘quirk theory’ – the observation that many of the differences that lead children to exclude each other socially in school are the same characteristics or skills that other people will value and admire about those students in adulthood or outside school.


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Cartel Circuit

The link at the top of the page doesn’t relate to the content of the page, it looks like the anchor text is incorrect. Would love to know what book you were referring to.

Sage

The link has been updated to refer to the book, The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth.