Research

New Uk government reports online 23rd-29th January 2010

February 1, 2011 899

Here is our latest weekly lisiting.

The future of food and farming – Challenges and choices for global sustainability. Department for Business, Innovation and Skills

Average time to employment for provider-led pathways customers Departmetn for Work and Pensions

17th Report – Ministry of Justice Financial Management- Public Accounts Committee HC 574.

National Non-domestic Rates Collected by Local Authorities in England 2009-10 (Revised)

DfE: Pupil absence in schools in England – Autumn term 2009 and Spring term 2010

Antisocial Behaviour Order Statistics: England and Wales 2009

Local Authority Revenue Expenditure and Financing: England 2009-10 final outturn (revised)

Home Office Statistical Bulletin: Police service strength – England and Wales – 30 September 2010

School Workforce in England – Including pupil to teacher and pupil to adult ratios – January 2010

Local authority child poverty innovation pilot evaluation – Third synthesis report- Department for Education research.

Intervening to improve outcomes for vulnerable young people – A review of the evidenceDepartment for Education

Segmentation of children and young people examines the different segments and aims to improve policy design by considering the needs of different groups of children and young people and their likely reaction to government policies.

Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education: A mapping study of the prevalent models of delivery and their effectiveness. Department for Education

6th Report – Who does UK National Strategy? Further Report- Public Administration Committee HC 713

4th Report – Lessons from the process of government formation after the 2010 general election Political and Constitutional Reform Committee HC 528.
additional written evidence

Reducing losses in the benefits system caused by customers’ mistakes National Audit Office HC 704

Home Office: Review of counter-terrorism and security powers

General Lifestyle Survey

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