Interdisciplinarity

Dispatches from Social and Behavioral Scientists on COVID

May 5, 2022 2757

Has the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic impacted how social and behavioral scientists view and conduct research? If so, how exactly? And what are the lessons learned so far from their research in this environment? Watch this series of short videos from SAGE Publishing to explore such questions as: 

  • What is one message about COVID that the social and behavioral sciences teaches us?
  • What are the most relevant social and behavioral sciences findings the public should understand?
  • What do you want others to know about what’s happening with your research due to COVID?
  • Are there any published articles in the social and behavioral sciences that are particularly insightful on these topics?
  • After living with COVID for two years, how do you see it impacting social and behavioral scientists in the future?
  • What have the news media and government officials gotten wrong about COVID’s impact on the social and behavioral sciences?

Dispatches from the Field: COVID & Marketing 

In this video, Maura Scott, professor of marketing at Florida State University’s College of Business, discusses what the marketing discipline can teach us about COVID, the most relevant findings that you should understand, key research, what the media has gotten wrong, and much more. 


Dispatches from the Field: COVID & Psychological Science 

Maryanne Garry, professor of cognitive psychology at the University of Waikato, discusses what psychological science can teach us about COVID, the most relevant findings that you should understand, key research, what the media has gotten wrong, and much more. 


Dispatches from the Field: COVID & Sociology 

Rashawn Ray, professor of sociology at the University of Maryland, discusses what sociology can teach us about COVID, the most relevant findings that you should understand, key research, what the media has gotten wrong, and much more.


Dispatches from the Field: COVID & Public Health 

Beth Chaney, professor of health science at the University of Alabama, discusses what public health can teach us about COVID, the most relevant findings that you should understand, key research, what the media has gotten wrong, and much more. 

Sage, the parent of Social Science Space, is a global academic publisher of books, journals, and library resources with a growing range of technologies to enable discovery, access, and engagement. Believing that research and education are critical in shaping society, 24-year-old Sara Miller McCune founded Sage in 1965. Today, we are controlled by a group of trustees charged with maintaining our independence and mission indefinitely. 

View all posts by Sage

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