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Congress, Business & Advocates Need Good Data; Why Survey Response Rates are Falling

April 22, 2013 774

A Congressional briefing in the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center:

Legislators, advocates and businesses depend on data to do their work. Much of this comes from federally sponsored surveys such as the American Community Survey and the National Survey of Child Health.

But in this busy day and age, people are no longer answering their home phones and aren’t participating in these surveys. Without this info, designing programs and understanding the nation’s needs will become increasingly difficult.

It’s time to explore new ways of collecting data. Whether you work on Capitol Hill on issues such as education, poverty, hunger or housing, work in the business community, or advocate for social issues, this briefing is important to you. We hope you’ll join the discussion around surveys and the American Academy of Political and Social Science’s report, The Nonresponse Challenge to Surveys and Statistics.

Click here to RSVP.

Friday, April 26, 2013, 10 a.m.

Congressional Visitors Center SVC 209-08

Panelists:

  • Moderator: Clarence Page, Columnist and Editorial Writer, Chicago Tribune
  • Douglas Massey*, President of the American Academy of Political and Social Science and Princeton University Professor.
  • Roger Tourangeau*, Vice President, Westat
  • Kenneth Prewitt, Columbia School of International and Public Affairs, and Former Director, U.S. Census Bureau
  • Paul Emrath, Vice President for Survey and Housing Policy Research, National Association of Home Builders
  • David McMillen, Former Professional Staff, House and Senate Committees overseeing the federal statistical system

*Mr. Massey and Mr. Tourangeau are the editors of the AAPSS’s report, The Nonresponse Challenge to Surveys and Statistics

The briefing is sponsored by the American Academy of Political and Social Science, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the National Academies’ Committee on National Statistics, SAGE Publications and the Russell Sage Foundation.

Questions? Contact Tamanna Mansury, 301-656-0348

Sage, the parent of Social Science Space, is a global academic publisher of books, journals, and library resources with a growing range of technologies to enable discovery, access, and engagement. Believing that research and education are critical in shaping society, 24-year-old Sara Miller McCune founded Sage in 1965. Today, we are controlled by a group of trustees charged with maintaining our independence and mission indefinitely. 

View all posts by Sage

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