Month: June 2018

innovation sign

Business-Academic Collaboration Remains Vigilant on Research Funding

Funding for basic research, visas for scholars from outside the United States, and streamlining regulations that get in the way of research are areas of concern for a consortium of business and academic interests that annually reviews the state of American government’s commitment to innovation.

1 year ago
42

Academia to be Accountable for Sustainable Finance

The academic world has the power to transform events in redefining its social mission, by responding to this highly ambitious EU action plan with the emergence of courses that match the expectations not only of businesses but, above all, society.

1 year ago
30

Building a Foundation on Solid Evidence

Ziyad Marar, the president of global publishing for SAGE, explains how SAGE’s values and its mission “to build bridges to knowledge” overlap with the intent of the United Kingdom’s Evidence Week, which takes place later this June.

1 year ago
75

Six Principles for Scientists Seeking Hiring, Promotion, and Tenure

The negative consequences of relying too heavily on metrics to assess research quality are well known, potentially fostering practices harmful to scientific research such as p-hacking, salami science, or selective reporting. To address this systemic problem, Florian Naudet, and collegues present six principles for assessing scientists for hiring, promotion, and tenure.

1 year ago
74

Report: Math Skills Increasingly Important for Social Science Grads

A new report from Britain’s Campaign for Social Science, Positive Prospects: Careers for Social Scientists and Why Data and Number Skills Matter, argues that at least for the social sciences, graduates in the United Kingdom can find work and will make as much as the body of physical science and technology graduates that are held up as the most marketable.

1 year ago
35

How Social Media Was Cited in Impact Case Studies?

In their previous Impact Blog post, Katy Jordan and Mark Carrigan considered whether institutions have invested too much hope in social media as a solution to the problem of demonstrating research impact. Here they report on research analyzing how social media was cited in impact case studies submitted to the UK’s REF 2014.

1 year ago
103

Social Media Used in Role its Not Equipped For

In a rapidly changing higher education landscape, where the meaning of “impact” are continually developing, benefits of social media seems obvious. Increasing numbers of institutions are encouraging researchers to take up social media to communicate to wider society. However, as Katy Jordan and Mark Carrigan explain, the possibilities social media offers may lead to foreseen problems.

1 year ago
36
Social Science news bulletin

Washington and Social Science: Basic Research and Opioid Epidemic

One of the most important issues facing Congress this year is the opioid epidemic that has touched on the lives of so many Americans. On May 17, the House Committee on Energy and Commerce approved a package of 57 bills designed to address the crisis of health and behavior, and the full House is expected to debate these bills later this month.

1 year ago
60

SAGE Ocean Speaker Series #3: How Technology Fails Us & What to Do

#SAGETalks returns with the third installment of the FREE SAGE Ocean Speaker Series on June 11th in London at 6pm. Keith Porcaro, fellow at Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center, will present his work on data trusts, a legal tool for governing and protecting digital movements.

1 year ago
70

How to Tell a Story in Your Research Paper

People love stories. We watch, read, tell, and listen to stories every day. Despite this, most researchers don’t think in terms of story when they write a journal paper. To Anna Clemens, that’s a missed opportunity, that she helps solve so that we may be ready to write a paper that is concise, compelling, and easy to understand.

1 year ago
735
Celia Heyes

Celia Heyes on Cognitive Gadgets

How did humans diverge so markedly from animals? Apart from physical things like our “physical peculiarities,” as experimental psychologist Celia Heyes puts it, or our fine motor control, there’s something even more fundamentally – and cognitively — different. hear more in our newest Social Science Bites podcast.

1 year ago
324
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