Event

‘Democracy in the Balance’ Series Finale Examines ‘Frontiers of Democratic Reform’

April 11, 2022 1854
https://americandemocracycollaborative.org/

In the third and final panel in “Democracy in the Balance,” a series of virtual discussions about democratic vulnerability and resilience in the United States, “Frontiers of Democratic Reform” will explore the practical steps that can be taken to guard against democratic backsliding in the United States and bolster the integrity of a functional national government. The hour-plus event starts at 1 p.m. ET on Wednesday, April 20.

Moderated by The New Yorker’s Jelani Cobb, the Ira A. Lipman Professor of Journalism at Columbia University, “Frontiers” will host panelists Judd Choate, director of the Colorado Division of Elections; Lee Drutman, a senior fellow in the Political Reform program at New America and author of Breaking the Two-Party Doom Loop; Hahrie Han, inaugural director of the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute at Johns Hopkins University; and Larry Jacobs, director of the Center for the Study of Politics and Governance in the Hubert H. Humphrey School and the Department of Political Science at the University of Minnesota.

Topics of discussion will include election administration, political party reform, proportional representation, and civic organizing.

The “Democracy in Balance” series is sponsored by Cornell University’s Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies, The American Academy of Political and Social Science, and the American Democracy Collaborative.

Learn more and register for the webinar here:


The first two sessions in the “Democracy in the Balance” series

Democratic Vulnerability and Resilience in the United States”

Moderator: E. J. Dionne (The Washington Post) Panelists: Carol Anderson (Emory University), Frances Lee (Princeton University), and Lilliana Mason (Johns Hopkins University)

“Lessons from Democracies at Risk: A Global Perspective”

Moderator: Zack Beauchamp (Vox) Panelists: Jennifer McCoy (Georgia State University) Cas Mudde (University of Georgia) Ken Roberts (Cornell University)

The American Academy of Political and Social Science, one of the nation’s oldest learned societies, is dedicated to the use of social science to address important social problems. For over a century, our flagship journal, The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, has brought together public officials and scholars from across the disciplines to tackle issues ranging from racial inequality and intractable poverty to the threat of nuclear terrorism. Today, through conferences and symposia, podcast interviews with leading social scientists, and the annual induction of Academy Fellows and presentation of the Daniel Patrick Moynihan Prize, the Academy is dedicated to bridging the gap between academic research and the formation of public policy.

View all posts by American Academy of Political and Social Science

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