Suzanne Bouffard

Suzanne Bouffard is a writer with a passion for making social science research accessible to the general public. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, Parents, the Harvard Education Letter, and other outlets, and she is the winner of a 2013 Solutions Journalism Network grant. She holds a Ph.D. in psychology from Duke University.

Seeking a Better Way to Evaluate Teachers

Teacher observations are both costly and time intensive, but perhaps it’s time to invest in better teacher evaluation to get better student results. So argues Robert Pianta, who has personally helped develop some measures that might achieve such high hopes, in a an article in the journal PIBBS..

3 years ago
109
Teens listening through earbuds

Redefining What It Means To Be An Adult

When does a modern young person become an ‘adult’? Age 13? 16? 18? 21? Legal definitions aside, young people in the developed world are feeling they’ve become independent operators much later in life than ever before.

4 years ago
190
Distracted riving warning

Hands-free Technology is Not Enough to Prevent Distracted Driving

Putting down your phone is merely the first step in banishing distractions while you drive, according to research in the journal ‘Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences.’ In fact, asking Siri to do something at a remove is pretty darned dangerous, too.

4 years ago
246

Tackling Gender Stereotypes With the Power of Words

Gendered language shapes how we think about the appropriate roles for men and women, especially when we are children and just beginning to form our understanding of the world. That might not sound like a problem, but it can reinforce stereotypes we are trying to tear down.

4 years ago
301
good habits road sign

How to Create Lasting Change 

How interventions are designed matter as much as what they do. In that vein, Harvard researchers Erin Frey and Todd Rogers have identified four pathways through which behavior change interventions can achieve long-term impact.

4 years ago
64

Looking at Affirmative Action in a New Light

Stereotype threat occurs when an individual is afraid of confirming a negative stereotype about a group to which he or she belongs and, in a cruel irony, performs worse because of it. Research shows the phenomenon is real and can sabotage affirmative action.

4 years ago
196
Hands holding dollars

Perceived Gaps in Equity Affect Decisions More Than Absolute Gaps

The absolute difference between what someone else is getting compared to what you get matters less than how feel about any disparity, according to a review of ‘relative deprivation’ research in the journal ‘Policy Insights from the Brain and Behavioral Sciences.’

4 years ago
62
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