After the Tsunami Scare: Crisis and Disaster Management Perspectives

Although it stirred panic, this week’s 8.6-magnitude earthquake off the Indonesian coast did not cause a tsunami. It did serve as a successful test of the warning systems put in place after 2004’s devastating tsunami in South Asia–underscoring the importance of disaster preparedness at all levels.

In today’s post, we highlight three articles that explore crisis and disaster management, including a study on perceived organizational preparedness for coping with a major crisis or disaster; a look at how organizational leaders can better understand their environments so as to avoid such events, and develop plans to cope with them if they do occur; and an exploration of crisis preparedness focused on the U.S. tourism industry.

We hope you find this selection insightful and thought-provoking.

Karen L. Fowler, Nathan D. Kling, and Milan D. Larson, all of the Monfort College of Business

Organizational Preparedness for Coping With a Major Crisis or Disaster

Business & Society (March 2007)

      
 

Jason B. Moats of Texas Engineering Extension Service, Thomas J. Chermack of Colorado State University, and Larry M. Dooley of Texas A&M University

Using Scenarios to Develop Crisis Managers: Applications of Scenario Planning and Scenario-Based Training

Advances in Developing Human Resources (June 2008)

    

Lori Pennington-Gray, Brijesh Thapa, Kyriaki Kaplanidou, Ignatius Cahyanto, and Elaine McLaughlin, all of the University of Florida, Gainesville

Crisis Planning and Preparedness in the United States Tourism Industry

Cornell Hospitality Quarterly (August 2011)

    

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Business & Management INK

Business and Management INK puts the spotlight on research published in our more than 100 management and business journals. We feature an inside view of the research that’s being published in top-tier SAGE journals by the authors themselves.