Business and Management INK

Hey Oscar, Are Awards a Double-Edged Sword? Business and Management INK
Replica Oscar statuettes in a souvenir shop. (Photo: Adarsh Upadhyay/Flickr)

Hey Oscar, Are Awards a Double-Edged Sword?

March 3, 2014 1649

Fake Oscar statuettes
Replica Oscar statuettes in a souvenir shop. (Photo: Adarsh Upadhyay/Flickr)

This piece was originally posted on SAGE’s Management Ink blog as “Are Awards a Double-Edged Sword?” and is resposted here with the permission of Management Ink Editor Cynthia Nalevanko.

***

The Oscars have been awarded! But just how does winning an award affect the prizewinner? Not the way you would think, according to Balázs Kovács and Amanda J. Sharkey’s article “The Paradox of Publicity: How Awards Can Negatively Affect the Evaluation of Quality” published in the March issue of Administrative Science Quarterly.

The abstract:
Although increases in status often lead to more favorable inferences about quality in subsequent evaluations, in this paper, we examine a setting in which an increase to an actor’s status results in less favorable quality evaluations, contrary to what much of sociological and management theory would predict. Comparing thousands of reader reviews on Goodreads.com of 64 English-language books that either won or were short-listed for prestigious book awards between 2007 and 2011, we find that prizewinning books tend to attract more readers following the announcement of an award and that readers’ ratings of award-winning books tend to decline more precipitously following the announcement of an award relative to books that were named as finalists but did not win. We explain this surprising result, focusing on two mechanisms whereby signals of quality that tend to promote adoption can subsequently have a negative impact on evaluation. First, we propose that the audience evaluating a high-status actor or object tends to shift as a result of a public status shock, like an award, increasing in number but also in diverse tastes. We outline how this shift might translate into less favorable evaluations of quality. Second, we show that the increase in popularity that tends to follow a status shock is off-putting to some, also resulting in more negative evaluations. We show that our proposed mechanisms together explain the negative effect of status on evaluations in the context of the literary world.

Read this piece for free by clicking here.

***

Click here to read another view of this phenomenon (and paper) drawn from Pacific Standard.


Related Articles

Responsible Management Education Week 2024: Sage Asks ‘What Does It Mean to You?’
Business and Management INK
June 19, 2024

Responsible Management Education Week 2024: Sage Asks ‘What Does It Mean to You?’

Read Now
How ‘Dad Jokes’ Help Children Learn How To Handle Embarrassment
Insights
June 14, 2024

How ‘Dad Jokes’ Help Children Learn How To Handle Embarrassment

Read Now
‘Push, Pull, Dance’: Public Health Procurement – Saving Lives and Preventing Harm
Business and Management INK
June 12, 2024

‘Push, Pull, Dance’: Public Health Procurement – Saving Lives and Preventing Harm

Read Now
Beyond Net-Zero Targets: When Do Companies Maximize Their Potential to Reduce Carbon Emissions?
Business and Management INK
June 4, 2024

Beyond Net-Zero Targets: When Do Companies Maximize Their Potential to Reduce Carbon Emissions?

Read Now
How Social Science Can Hurt Those It Loves

How Social Science Can Hurt Those It Loves

David Canter rues the way psychologists and other social scientists too often emasculate important questions by forcing them into the straitjacket of limited scientific methods.

Read Now
How AI-Integration is Changing the Workplace

How AI-Integration is Changing the Workplace

The authors describe how their study investigated how middle managers perceive the impacts of AI-system integration on their work characteristics in the financial services industry.

Read Now
Keeping Qualitative Research Weird!

Keeping Qualitative Research Weird!

The authors urge qualitative researchers to retain what makes qualitative research different and powerful and yes… weird: the researcher’s voice, multitudes of potential data sources, and meaningful contextualization.

Read Now
0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments