Communication

Webinar: Innovations in Disseminating Psychological Science

May 19, 2014 918

Earlier this month Aime Ballard-Wood, director of publications for the Association for Psychological Science, discussed recent efforts for heightened dissemination of psychological science research involving the association’s journals, the Open Science Framework, and Wikipedia. The webinar, hosted by the Special Library Association, is available here:

The association, Ballard-Wood explains, is seeking new ways to leverage technological advances to improve research practices and disseminate science. Some examples she offers:

  • The journal Psychological Science has implemented new guidelines to promote robust research and encourage transparency through practices that include data and material sharing and preregistration of study design.
  • Perspectives on Psychological Science has introduced Registered Replication Reports, a new type of article that presents the results of multicenter replication studies facilitated by the Open Science Framework, an open-source software project enabling open collaboration in scientific research.
  • APS’s Wikipedia Initiative is enlisting experts and their students to use Wikipedia to represent scientific psychology as fully and as accurately as possible and thereby promote the free teaching of psychology worldwide.

SAGE, the parent of Social Science Space and the publisher of the Association for Psychological Science journals, sponsored this webinar.


Sage, the parent of Social Science Space, is a global academic publisher of books, journals, and library resources with a growing range of technologies to enable discovery, access, and engagement. Believing that research and education are critical in shaping society, 24-year-old Sara Miller McCune founded Sage in 1965. Today, we are controlled by a group of trustees charged with maintaining our independence and mission indefinitely. 

View all posts by Sage

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