Recognition

Call for Nominations for the 2018 CASBS-SAGE Awards

April 25, 2018 999

The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) at Stanford University and SAGE Publishing are announcing nominations to the fifth annual SAGE-CASBS awards. The award goes to Researchers who have made outstanding societal contributions by using social and behavioral research to address or understand vital social concerns.

Casbs_logoPast winners include 2002 Nobel laureate in economic sciences Daniel Kahneman, and Kenneth Prewitt, former director of the U.S. Census Bureau.

The selection committee, co-chaired by Sara Miller McCune (SAGE Founder and Executive Chairman) and Margaret Levi, CASBS Director, will consist of four additional members who, after an extensive review, will announce the SAGE-CASBS Award winner in June of 2018. The winner will receive a cash prize and deliver a public lecture held at CASBS in November of this year.

Nominees should represent the best of contemporary social science and demonstrate sustained passion in their efforts to transform research. Their work should have a positive impact on society as a whole and transformative consequences for a significant arena of social, political, or economic life. CASBS and SAGE seek nominees from any part of the world and from any of the social and behavioral science fields.

The deadline for submission is May 7, 2018. For more details on nominations read the press release.  To access and submit the online nomination form, visit the CASBS website. (NOTE: no self-nominations are accepted)

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“Social and behavioral science research improves human welfare in a way that other sciences cannot… Accordingly, social and behavioral scientists deserve recognition for their contributions. SAGE and CASBS are proud to present an award that honors and celebrates transformative ideas and knowledge that also advance public discourse, influence policy debates and, ideally, lead to real-world solutions and change.” – SAGE founder and executive chairman Sara Miller McCune and CASBS director Margaret Levi

Sage, the parent of Social Science Space, is a global academic publisher of books, journals, and library resources with a growing range of technologies to enable discovery, access, and engagement. Believing that research and education are critical in shaping society, 24-year-old Sara Miller McCune founded Sage in 1965. Today, we are controlled by a group of trustees charged with maintaining our independence and mission indefinitely. 

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