News

Responsible Business Education Awards Seek to Honor Business Impacts

October 12, 2022 1150
Stylized drawing of graduate surrounded by business tools
(Image: The Financial Times Responsible Business Award page)

The Financial Times is inviting business school students and faculty members to enter 2023 Responsible Business Education Awards. Those interested may enter until October 28.

The awards honor those who have engaged in innovative projects over the last three years which have had positive impacts on society or the environment. They also celebrate business schools “the put purpose above profit” and academic research the produces “smart ideas with real-world impact.”

The three categories are best student-led projects which have partnered with organizations, best business school teaching cases or pedagogical resources with a focus on environmental issues and best business school academic research with evidence of positive impacts in society.

Past honorees include:

  • Johanna Baare, IE Business School alumnus, who began Traceless, which uses natural biopolymers in agricultural industry residues to replace plastic materials.
  • Enrico Biffis and Erik Chavez from the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris, who wrote a paper about how parametric insurance can improve access to finance and technology in low income countries.
  • Gaetano Lapenta, Politecnico di Milano School of Management alumnus, who began Fybra, which exploits natural ventilation to improve air quality in enclosed areas.

Contestants will be judged by an external panel of judges and announced in editorial coverage by The Financial Times.

Molly Gahagen is a third-year student at Johns Hopkins University studying political science and international studies. She is currently the social science communications intern at SAGE Publishing.

View all posts by Molly Gahagen

Related Articles

Contemporary Politics Focus of March Webinar Series
News
February 21, 2024

Contemporary Politics Focus of March Webinar Series

Read Now
A Behavioral Scientist’s Take on the Dangers of Self-Censorship in Science
Interview
February 14, 2024

A Behavioral Scientist’s Take on the Dangers of Self-Censorship in Science

Read Now
SSRC Links with U.S. Treasury on Evaluation Projects
Announcements
February 1, 2024

SSRC Links with U.S. Treasury on Evaluation Projects

Read Now
There’s Something In the Air…But Is It a Virus? Part 1
Public Policy
January 18, 2024

There’s Something In the Air…But Is It a Virus? Part 1

Read Now
New Report Finds Social Science Key Ingredient in Innovation Recipe

New Report Finds Social Science Key Ingredient in Innovation Recipe

A new report from Britain’s Academy of Social Sciences argues that the key to success for physical science and technology research is a healthy helping of relevant social science.

Read Now
Your Data Likely Isn’t Best Served in a Pie Chart

Your Data Likely Isn’t Best Served in a Pie Chart

Overall, it is best to use pie charts sparingly, especially when there is a more “digestible” alternative – the bar chart.

Read Now
Research Integrity Should Not Mean Its Weaponization

Research Integrity Should Not Mean Its Weaponization

Commenting on the trend for the politically motivated forensic scrutiny of the research records of academics, Till Bruckner argues that singling out individuals in this way has a chilling effect on academic freedom and distracts from efforts to address more important systemic issues in research integrity.

Read Now
0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments