Business and Management INK

About the PMJ Practitioner Insights Series

March 22, 2023 1051

PMJ Practitioner Insights is a series of short, empirically relevant articles that disseminate research findings to project practitioners and also benefit academics and students in the field of project management. The series features condensed versions of academic research papers in a language accessible to non-academic readers. The series bridges the gap between academia and practice by providing actionable insights from research that busy project, program, and portfolio managers can apply in their work.

Logo of the Project Management Institute

The series is an initiative of the Project Management Institute (PMI), the leading professional association for project management. PMI is committed to advancing the project management profession through research, education, and advocacy. PMJ Practitioner Insights is one of the ways PMI is fulfilling its mission to provide value to its members and the wider project management community.

The articles in the series cover a wide range of contemporary topics related to the management of projects, programs, and portfolios of projects, including leadership, communication, risk management, and governance. Each article is authored by the researchers who conducted the particular study in the respective topic area. The articles are selected based on their authors’ expertise and the relevance of their research to practitioners, students, and academics.

As such, PMJ Practitioner Insights are short, two-page summaries of academic, peer-reviewed research papers published in Project Management Journal®, one of the leading research journals in project management. The peer-review process ensures meeting the highest standards of quality and rigor and involves a panel of experts in project management who evaluate, over multiple reviews, the articles for their accuracy, rigor, and relevance.

In addition to the links below, PMJ Practitioner Insight articles are freely available on the Project Management Journal’s website. By reading the articles in this series, practitioners can gain valuable insights that can help them improve performance and achieve better outcomes in their projects.

In summary, the PMJ Practitioner Insights series is a valuable resource for practitioners in project management who want to stay informed about the latest research in their field. The series provides concise and easy-to-read articles that distill the key findings of academic research into actionable insights that practitioners can apply with their teams in their work.


Practitioner Insights

Six open laptops sitting on wooden table at workplace

Motivation of Young Project Professionals: Their Needs for Autonomy, Competence, Relatedness, and Purpose

Young professionals born between the early 1980s and mid-1990s now constitute a majority of the project management workforce. Having grown up connected, collaborative, and mobile, they have specific motivations and needs, which are explored in this study.

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Framework of wooden boards

A Complexity Framework for Project Management Strategies

Contemporary projects frequently pose complexities that cannot be adequately tackled by the classical project management tradition. This article offers a diagnostic tool to help identify the type of complexity of a project and determine the most suitable strategy for addressing it.

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Metal beams create framing for large building under construction

Interorganizational Design for Collaborative Governance in Co-Owned Major Projects: An Engaged Scholarship Approach

Large projects co-owned by several organizations with separate, perhaps competing, interests and values are characterized by complexity and are not served well […]

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Android in deep metacognition

Data Analytics and Artificial Intelligence in the Complex Environment of Megaprojects: Implications for Practitioners and Project Organizing Theory

The authors review the ways in which data analytics and artificial intelligence can engender more stability and efficiency in megaprojects. They evaluate the present and likely future use of digital technology—particularly with regard to construction projects — discuss the likely benefits, and also consider some of the challenges around digitization.

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Complex series of slats forming rows of squares

Coping with Institutional Complexity and Voids: An Organization Design Perspective for Transnational Interorganizational Projects

Institutional complexity occurs when the structures, interests, and activities of separate but collaborating organizations—often across national and cultural boundaries—are not well aligned. Institutional voids in this context are gaps in function or capability, including skills gaps, lack of an effective regulatory regime, and weak contract-enforcing mechanisms.

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Woodcut shows men and mules resting from digging embankment above railway tracks with smoke rising from various other camps in the distance.

What You Should Know About Megaprojects and Why: An Overview

This article by Bent Flyvbjerg examines the misconceptions and strategic misrepresentations that routinely result in the implementation of projects for which there is inadequate justification, absorbing funds that could have been better spent elsewhere.

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Hands sit on a laptop displaying a blueprint.

Opening The Black Box Of Benefits Management In The Context Of Projects

The main goal of our study was, hence, to complement the current technical knowledge on benefits management with an in-depth understanding of the social practices that constitute benefits management.

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What Are The Causes And Cures Of Poor Megaproject Performance?

What is missing in current research and practice is an understanding of megaprojects as a complete production system—from planning through design, manufacturing, and
construction, to integration and handover to operations. Thinking about megaprojects as
production systems may help us understand how the different dimensions—the six themes
identified in our research—work together to achieve a project’s goals and deliver valuable
outcomes.

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black hole of numbers

How Digital Information Transforms Project Delivery Models

As the computational devices used in all aspects of project delivery are becoming progressively smaller and cheaper, digital information is changing what projects deliver, with information becoming itself a deliverable.

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Project Management Institute logo

About the PMJ Practitioner Insights Series

PMJ Practitioner Insights is a series of short, empirically relevant articles that disseminate research findings to project practitioners and also benefit academics […]

0 comments

Agile, Traditional, and Hybrid Approaches to Project Success: Is Hybrid a Poor Second Choice?

The authors found that hybrid approaches deliver similar results to traditional or agile approaches on schedule, budget, and scope delivery, and the hybrid approach outperforms traditional approaches on client satisfaction.

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Project Management Institute is the leading professional association for project management, and the authority for a growing global community of millions of project professionals and individuals who use project management skills.

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