Interdisciplinarity

Psychology of Women Quarterly celebrates its 35th Anniversary

August 22, 2011 867

In celebration, of its 35th anniversary, Psychology of Women Quarterly has published three podcasts, which address Feminist Methods, Training, Tenure, and Research, and the Future of Feminism. The panel included Rhonda K. Unger, author of “Through the Looking Glass Once More”; Nicola Gavey, author of “Feminist Poststructuralism and Discourse Analysis Revisited”; Pamela Trotman Reid, author of “Revisiting “Poor Women: Shut Up and Shut Out”;  and Jean M. Twenge, author of “The Duality of Individualism: Attitudes Toward Women, Generation Me, and the Method of Cross-Temporal Meta-Analysis.”

Click here to access all three anniversary podcasts.

Editorial Assistant - Social Science Journals at SAGE in Los Angeles

View all posts by Lisa Hanson

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