Business and Management INK

Too Much Workplace Data? Not So, Experts Say

June 25, 2013 847

a2There’s no shortage of studies and surveys these days on workplace trends, covering everything from gender biases and generational proclivities to when, where, and how workers are productive, stressed, engaged, or motivated. In his column this week, the Chicago Tribune’s Rex Huppke found himself “drowning” in a river of research, asking: Are we overanalyzing the workplace? He spoke with JOM_v38_72ppiRGB_150pixWJournal of Management editor Deborah Rupp, the William C. Byham Chair in Industrial/Organizational Psychology at Purdue University, who eloquently explained why workplace studies are so abundant and why the data matters:

She quoted William Faulkner: “You can’t eat eight hours a day nor drink for eight hours a day nor make love for eight hours — all you can do for eight hours is work.”

“Work is just a very pervasive part of the human experience,” Rupp said. “People are now working more than they’re doing everything else, except maybe sleeping. But in a lot of cases not even sleeping. It’s the venue in which we’re carrying out our lives.”

So this intense study is, in Rupp’s opinion, a good thing. And it marks a significant change in concern for our overall well-being.

For ages, the primary focus of workplace monitoring was to figure out how to squeeze as much work out of people as possible. The concept of “work” and “life” melding together is, in the grand scheme of things, relatively new.

Click here to read Rex Huppke’s article in the Chicago Tribune. Learn more about the Journal of Management by visiting the JOM home page here, and keep up with important issues in management by following the JOM Editor’s Choice collections.

Business and Management INK puts the spotlight on research published in our more than 100 management and business journals. We feature an inside view of the research that’s being published in top-tier SAGE journals by the authors themselves.

View all posts by Business & Management INK

Related Articles

Responsible Management Education Week 2024: Sage Asks ‘What Does It Mean to You?’
Business and Management INK
June 19, 2024

Responsible Management Education Week 2024: Sage Asks ‘What Does It Mean to You?’

Read Now
‘Push, Pull, Dance’: Public Health Procurement – Saving Lives and Preventing Harm
Business and Management INK
June 12, 2024

‘Push, Pull, Dance’: Public Health Procurement – Saving Lives and Preventing Harm

Read Now
Beyond Net-Zero Targets: When Do Companies Maximize Their Potential to Reduce Carbon Emissions?
Business and Management INK
June 4, 2024

Beyond Net-Zero Targets: When Do Companies Maximize Their Potential to Reduce Carbon Emissions?

Read Now
How AI-Integration is Changing the Workplace
Business and Management INK
May 28, 2024

How AI-Integration is Changing the Workplace

Read Now
Keeping Qualitative Research Weird!

Keeping Qualitative Research Weird!

The authors urge qualitative researchers to retain what makes qualitative research different and powerful and yes… weird: the researcher’s voice, multitudes of potential data sources, and meaningful contextualization.

Read Now
Sometimes, We Do Need a Narcissist

Sometimes, We Do Need a Narcissist

Karynne Turner, Feray Adigüzel, and Jatinder S Sidhu reflect on their research article, “Chief executive officer narcissism, corporate inertia, and securities analysts’ stock […]

Read Now
From Collision to Collaboration: Bridging University and Industry Relationships

From Collision to Collaboration: Bridging University and Industry Relationships

In this article, Will Harvey and Paul Spee reflect on the importance of collaboration between industry and universities. This topic was the catalyst for their research article, “Walking the tightrope of academic and practitioner expectations in field research,” found in Management Learning.

Read Now
0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments