Business and Management INK

Using Simulation as a Training Tool for Project Management

February 12, 2014 842
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Educators work hard to make sure their pupils are prepared for their chosen field of work. Inside a classroom, however, this can prove challenging. Many teachers have begun turning to simulations that will help provide their students with the opportunity to put their knowledge to the test. In their article in Simulation and Gaming, “Evaluating a Project Management Simulation Training Exercise,”  Ki-Young Jeong and Ipek Bozkurt discuss their findings on using simulation as a training tool for  teaching students project management.

The abstract:

This research is an evaluation of a single-player, project management simulation training exercise. Our objective is to gain understanding about the extent to which it contributes to participants’ project management knowledge and skills. Results from pre- and post-simulation exercise questionnaires indicate that overall the simulation exercise S&G_2013_C1.inddsignificantly improves a participant’s conceptual knowledge about project management. It also indicates that participants with less experience achieve more knowledge improvement than those with more experience. Results further indicate that the actual performance of the exercise, which represents the educational value of the exercise, is primarily dependent on the post-project management knowledge of the participant established throughout the exercise, prior knowledge brought to the exercise, and the experience of the participant. We believe that these results indicate that the simulation training exercise is a valuable training tool, which both engineering and project managers can use.

Read “Evaluating a Project Management Simulation Training Exercise” in Simulation and Gaming for free by clicking here. Want to be notified of any new articles from Simulation and Gaming? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

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