Communication

Round-up of Social Science Research

March 26, 2015 845

The following articles are drawn from SAGE Insight, which spotlights research published in SAGE’s more than 800 journals. The articles linked below are free to read for a limited period.

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Virtual information training for a global business
Business Information Review

Congratulations to Bonnie Ranvild Frisendahl, whose paper in the December 2014 issue of Business Information Review was named the journal’s best paper of 2014.

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 Special Issue on India: Globalization and People at the Margins: Experiences from the Global South
Journal of Developing Societies

In this special issue, authors have tried to use the concept of marginalization in a more nuanced manner to increase the understanding of the sociological and anthropological aspects of the phenomena it encompasses.

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Republicans trust science – except when it comes to health insurance and gay adoption
The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science

There are only four issues where Republicans exhibit less trust than independents: global warming, evolution, gay adoption, and mandatory health insurance.

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Poverty, not the “teenage brain” account for high rates of teen crime
SAGE Open

This study finds that teenagers are no more naturally crime-prone than any other group with high poverty rates.

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Reconsidering findings of “no effects” in randomized control trials: Modeling differences in treatment impacts
American Journal of Evaluation

This article demonstrates that focusing on average treatment effects may underestimate program impacts when the impacts vary among subgroups.

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Children as members of a community
European Educational Research Journal

In this special issue authors discuss the subject of young people as citizens and, particularly, as members of a community.


Senior Marketing Manager at SAGE, and editor of the SAGE Insight blog

View all posts by Lorna McConville

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