Month: February 2016

Climate_Resilience_Model

Behavioral Science May Hold Some Keys to Climate Change

As we are often reminded, we urgently and drastically need to limit our use of one shared resource – fossil fuels – and its effect on another – the climate. But how realistic is this goal, both for national leaders and for us? Well, psychology may hold some answers.

4 years ago
192

Stephen Reicher on Crowd Psychology

“In a sense, you could summarize the literature: ‘Groups are bad for you, groups take moral individuals and they turn them into immoral idiots.’ I have been trying to contest that notion,” social psychologist Stephen Reicher says in this Social Science Bites podcast, “[and] also to explain how that notion comes about.”

4 years ago
1206

Archived Webinar: US Funding Picture for 2016

In this archived version of a webcast held on February 17, Mark Vieth — senior vice president of the Washington government relations firm CRD Associates – addresses these issues and others, including what the just-released federal budget from the White House means for federally funded research.

4 years ago
44

I’m Looking Through You, Peer Review

Jon Tennant takes a look at the transformations underway aimed at tackling the widespread dissatisfaction with the system of peer review. He provides further background on the platform ScienceOpen, which seeks to enable a process of transparent, self-regulating, peer review, where knowledge sharing is encouraged, valued, and rewarded. By adopting a more transparent process of research evaluation, we move one step closer towards a fairer and democratic research process. 

4 years ago
40

Methods in Action: Behavioral Tracking

In the first of monthly series we’re calling Methods in Action, Mark Griffiths reprises his SAGE Research Methods case study “The Use of Behavioural Tracking Methodologies in the Study of Online Gambling” to explain how he and his research partner harnessed the big data possibilities of online gambling to both assess behavior and see if ‘responsible gambling’ interventions really work.

4 years ago
54
Clerical work

The Deskilled Academic: Bureaucracy Defeats Scholarship

Intellectual labor comes to be largely external to the objectives of the bureaucratic regimes that dominate universities, argues our Daniel Nehring, and academics whose careers were built on intellectual labor turn out to be deskilled workers in organizational settings indifferent to their concerns.

4 years ago
220

Testing a Hypothesis? Be Upfront About It and Win $1,000

Both researchers and publishers are drawn to interesting results, and at times research bends itself to achieve those results — regardless of what hypothesis was originally under scrutiny. We must hold ourselves accountable to decisions made before seeing the data, argues David Mellor, who introduces a new prize for scholars who preregister their research.

4 years ago
60
Skip to toolbar