Event

Event: An Earth-Friendly Political Economy

April 13, 2021 1640

On April 28, 2021, join the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) in partnership with the Hewlett Foundation, the Institute for New Economic Thinking at Oxford University, and the Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford University.

The struggle against climate change relies on a toolkit of scientific innovation, harnessing economic markets in new ways, and building new forms of global governance and cooperation. But such tools, and the thinking underlying them, are not enough. They operate within the constraints of an outdated paradigm. Recent scientific forecasts, as well as imaginings of possible futures based on them, paint a visceral picture of large-scale catastrophe averted only by larger-scale transformation. A zero-carbon, economically sustainable civilization will require fundamental political and economic power shifts between those who are heavily invested in the existing energy economy and those demanding a different, and new, moral political economy.

How do we inform and design a new moral political economy of climate change? What new institutional arrangements will reflect values friendly to a thriving earth while reducing inequality for its billions of inhabitants? Join Eric Beinhocker, Genevieve Bell, and Kim Stanley Robinson in conversation with Arun Majumdar as they explore ways of re-centering the environmental alongside the human in service of understanding, devising, and implementing systems that may help us deliver our future safely and sustainably.

The event will be moderated by Arun Majumdar, Jay Precourt Provostial Chair Professor at Stanford University.

Visit the event page for more information here and read the new participant bios & photos here.

This is episode 14 in CASBS’s webcast series Social Science for a World in Crisis. Explore the series website at https://casbs.stanford.edu/social-science-world-crisis.

Sage, the parent of Social Science Space, is a global academic publisher of books, journals, and library resources with a growing range of technologies to enable discovery, access, and engagement. Believing that research and education are critical in shaping society, 24-year-old Sara Miller McCune founded Sage in 1965. Today, we are controlled by a group of trustees charged with maintaining our independence and mission indefinitely. 

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