Economics

Michelle Baddeley

Michelle Baddeley on the Herd

People tend to herd together, whether it’s following the crowd or determining what news to accept. UCL economist Michelle Baddeley has studied this behavior and discusses what she’s learned in this latest Social Science Bites podcast.

3 years ago
194
David Cameron

In This Indebted World, Austerity May Be Forever

Political economist Mark Blyth argues that in a highly indebted world, austerity – introduced as an ‘emergency’ measure to save the economy, to right the fiscal ship – has becomes a permanent state of affairs.

3 years ago
43
Hart and Holmström

Why Did Contract Theory Deserve a Nobel Prize?

As technology improves and organizations become more complex, the theory and practice of contract design will only increase in importance. As such, we owe, we owe a great debt to this year’s Nobel laureates in economics for giving us powerful tools to structure effective contracts.

3 years ago
34
Climate_Resilience_Model

Behavioral Science May Hold Some Keys to Climate Change

As we are often reminded, we urgently and drastically need to limit our use of one shared resource – fossil fuels – and its effect on another – the climate. But how realistic is this goal, both for national leaders and for us? Well, psychology may hold some answers.

4 years ago
149

Social Science’s Impact on Society, Circa 2065: Ian Quigg

In the final installment of the 10 top essays submitted to the ESRC reflecting on how a social science-influenced world will look in 2015, we present Ian Quigg’s ruminations on what capitalism will look like after another half century’s buffeting by the ‘perennial gale of creative destruction.’

4 years ago
47
Angus Deaton

Bridge-building Economist Angus Deaton Wins Nobel

The Nobel committee has awarded Princeton’s Angus Deaton ‘for his analysis of consumption, poverty, and welfare.’ But in fact, he was awarded for building bridges – between disciplines, between theory and reality, between people.

4 years ago
105
John Nash

The Game Theorist: John Nash, 1928-2015

The impact of John Nash’s initial work has been immense over the past 65 years. It seems certain that in his absence, the frameworks and mathematical language he refined and developed will continue to provide new insights into a diverse range of problems.

4 years ago
130
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