Business and Management INK

Whose Jobs Are These?

September 16, 2013 1379

women_cfosIn firms with more female managers, are newly created jobs more likely to be filled by men or by women?

Lisa E. Cohen of McGill University and Joseph P. Broschak of the University of Arizona uncover the answer and its implications for practice in their study, “Whose Jobs Are These? The Impact of the Proportion of Female Managers on the Number of New Management Jobs Filled by Women versus Men,” forthcoming in Administrative Science Quarterly and now available in the journal’s OnlineFirst section:

asq150In this paper, we examine the relationship between an organization’s proportion of female managers and the number of new management jobs initially filled by women versus men. We draw on theories of job differentiation, job change, and organizational demography to develop theory and predictions about this relationship and whether the relationship differs for jobs filled by female and male managers. Using data on a sample of New York City advertising agencies over a 13-year period, we find that the number of newly created jobs first filled by women increases with an agency’s proportion of female managers. In contrast, the effect of the proportion of female managers on the number of new management jobs filled by men is positive initially but plateaus and turns negative. In showing these influences on job creation, we highlight the dynamic and socially influenced nature of jobs themselves: new jobs are created regularly in firms and not merely as a response to technical and administrative imperatives. The results also point to another job-related process that differs between women and men and that could potentially aggravate, mitigate, or alleviate inequality: the creation of jobs. Thus this research contributes to literatures on demography, the organization of work, and inequality.

Continue reading the article online in Administrative Science Quarterly, and sign up for e-alerts here so you don’t miss out on ASQ’s latest articles and issues.

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