Business and Management INK

On The Job

November 1, 2013 2547

Every job requires some kind of training, whether it’s how to make smoothies or how to write complex computer code, there’s on-the-job training and it comes in all different styles. In the new paper recently published in Human Resource Development Review Dr. Barbara Ostrowski Martin of Humber Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning with Dr. Klodiana Kolomitrom and Dr. Tony C. M. Lam of the University of Toronto reviewed several different training methods so employers might easily learn what kind of training works best for both their employees and the required job. 

 The Abstract for Training Methods: A Review and Analysis :

In reviewing training methods reported in the literature, 13 were identified: case study, games-based training, internship, job rotation, job shadowing, lecture, mentoring and apprenticeship, programmed instruction, role-modeling, role play, simulation, stimulus-based training, and team-training. The nature and characteristics of these training methods and the relationships among them were analyzed using the following seven criteria: learning modality, learning environment, trainer presence, proximity, interaction level, cost considerations, and time demands. Results from this in-depth review suggest that the majority of training methods are not interactive, involve doing, and are off-the-job. As expected, it also concluded that technological advancements have expanded the delivHRD coverery mode to various distance options. Profiles for the 13 identified training methods generated from this research should assist practitioners in selecting training methods most suitable for their needs and circumstances and serve as a platform for future research and development.

Together, Management INK and SAGE publications are offering this article free for the next month. Read the full article here and don’t forget to sign up for e-alerts to get the latest from Human Resource Development Review.

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