Business and Management INK

Using “Sticktion” for a Better Customer Experience

March 28, 2014 927

Businesses work hard to ensure that their customers walk away happy. But just how much of a good experience dodont-forget-729159-m customers even remember? What can be done to make sure they remember more? That’s what Kathryn A. LaTour and Lewis P. Carbone set out to discover in their article “Sticktion: Assessing Memory for Customer Experience,” published in Cornell Hospitality Quarterly.

The abstract:

In the quest for better service design, hospitality and service firms have often been frustrated to find that service experiences that are based on what customers say they want are not always successful. A psychological analysis of this phenomenon suggests the following premises: (1) Customers’ memory of an experience fades quickly; (2) customers’ memory of an experience comprises many sub-experiences; (3) customers’ memories of experiences are multidimensional and cqx coverunintuitive; and (4) consumers cannot accurately predict what they will learn or remember. The goal of an experience design is to create a series of sub-experiences that will “stick” with the customer. This “sticktion” analysis is applied to the practical challenge of redesigning the customer experience at Pizza Hut UK. This consumer research provides a test of the four premises and an application of the underlying sticktion principles. Surveys of Pizza Hut customers found that the existing experience had its bright spots but was generally forgettable. Not only could customers not predict what they would remember about the experience, but one week after visiting the restaurant, the customers also filled in memory gaps with details that did not appear on their initial description of the visit. Even more troublesome was the fact that the invented details tended to be negative. To fill these gaps, the researchers tested specific aspects of the experience that would “stick” and included those in the new restaurant concepts. Using this approach, the chain was able to roll out new concepts that met with initial favorable results.

Business and Management INK puts the spotlight on research published in our more than 100 management and business journals. We feature an inside view of the research that’s being published in top-tier SAGE journals by the authors themselves.

View all posts by Business & Management INK

Related Articles

Good Governance, Strong Trust: Building Community Among an Australian City Rebuilding Project
Business and Management INK
February 8, 2024

Good Governance, Strong Trust: Building Community Among an Australian City Rebuilding Project

Read Now
A Black History Addendum to the American Music Industry
Insights
February 6, 2024

A Black History Addendum to the American Music Industry

Read Now
Organizational Learning in Remote Teams: Harnessing the Power of Games for Meaningful Online Exchanges
Business and Management INK
February 2, 2024

Organizational Learning in Remote Teams: Harnessing the Power of Games for Meaningful Online Exchanges

Read Now
Environmental and Social Sustainability Methods in Online and In-Person Shopping
Business and Management INK
January 30, 2024

Environmental and Social Sustainability Methods in Online and In-Person Shopping

Read Now
Revitalizing Entrepreneurship to Benefit Low-Income Communities

Revitalizing Entrepreneurship to Benefit Low-Income Communities

While entrepreneurship scholarship increasingly illustrates the limits of an individualized approach in commercial businesses, this thinking has not yet filtered through to how we strategize entrepreneurship in low income-areas.

Read Now
The Key to Dismantling Oppressive Global Systems

The Key to Dismantling Oppressive Global Systems

In this article, Nazarina Jamil, Maria Humphries-Kil, and Kahurangi Dey explore Paulo Freire’s call for responsibility for those who are marginalized and his Pedagogy of Hope to encourage action and inspiration around the dismantling of oppressive global systems.

Read Now
Using Affective Displays to Predict Customer Satisfaction

Using Affective Displays to Predict Customer Satisfaction

In this article, Shelly Ashtar reflects on her longstanding interest in service-related work and how it connects to her research interest in customer satisfaction. Ashtar explores this topic with collaborators Galit B. Yom-Tov, Anat Rafaeli and Jochen Wirtz in “Affect-as-Information: Customer and Employee Affective Displays as Expeditious Predictors of Customer Satisfaction,” in the Journal of Service Research.

Read Now
0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments