Higher Education Reform

Participants Sought for Colorism in Academia Survey

September 23, 2020 3328
(Image: PinClipArt.com)

Colorism, also called skin tone bias, is discrimination based on the shade of an individual’s skin tone, typically favoring lighter complexions, within or outside of the same racial group. 

Aimee Haynes, a Ph.D. candidate at Florida’s Nova Southeastern University, is conducting research on colorism experiences among non-White women leaders in higher education careers. She’s asking readers of Social Science Space who fit certain criteria to fill out her anonymous online survey by September 30.

For this study, potential participants should identify as a minority/person of color/non-Caucasian female and currently, or previously have held, a managerial/leadership position in higher education. Participants may be of any age.

For purposes of the survey, a managerial role may include, but is not limited to, team or course lead, supervisor, manager, department chair, chief academic officer, any level of deanship or directorship, governing board member, president, vice president, etc.

Participants can expect to spend 10-15 minutes completing the survey regarding their thoughts, personal experiences, and perceived impact of skin tone bias in the higher education industry. Participants only need a PC or cellphone with internet service and some time. 

Haynes’ “Colorism in Academia” online survey can be reached here: https://is.gd/ColorisminAcademiaSurvey Submissions are sought by September 30.

Haynes has said her findings will inform research on workplace conflict, inclusion, diversity, and social justice in higher education.

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