Daniel Nehring

My career so far has taken me to a fairly wide range of places, and this has allowed me to experience a wide range of approaches to sociology and social science. In my blog, I reflect on this diversity and its implications for the future of the discipline. Over the last few years, I have also become interested in exploring the contours of academic life under neoliberal hegemony. Far-reaching transformations are taking place at universities around the world, in terms of organisational structures, patterns of authority, and forms of intellectual activity. With my posts, I hope to draw attention to some of these transformations.

Nehring Corporate bug

Tinkering With Symptoms: Why Britain’s Debate About Vice Chancellors’ Salaries Is Misguided

The last few weeks have seen a growing public debate about the pay packages of Britain’s academic CEOs. The vice chancellors at a number of universities, including Birmingham, Bath, Bath Spa and others, have come under heavy pressure to justify salaries that far exceed £100,000, Oddly, all the arguments for and against this start with the assumption that universities are just like any other business.

5 years ago
882

Brexit McCarthyism, Universities PLC and the Erosion of Academic Freedom in the UK

Last week the UK academic world was abuzz about Chris Heaton- Harris’ letter on Brexit. This week it’s not. This lack of lasting public interest in threats to academic freedom is lamentable even as the corporatization of the nation’s universities is the biggest threat facing academic life and flies completely under the public’s radar, argues Daniel Nehring.

5 years ago
972

Anti-Intellectualism and the Rise of the British Right

Largely missing from the debate about the growth of alt-right-ish movements and cultural currents, argues our Daniel Nehring, is sustained engagement with the consequences of the shifts that are currently underway in education.

5 years ago
4069
Nehring Corporate bug

What Do the 2017 Elections Mean for British Academia?

Britain’s recent general election has been the first step towards a long-overdue public debate on the social consequences of austerity and growing socio-economic inequality. What does this sea change mean for British academia?

5 years ago
918
Airport queue

In Post-Brexit Britain, is Migration a Crime?

With the increasing indications that Britain is growing colder to migrants in the wake of Brexit, Daniel Nehring asks what that means specifically for academics from the European Union in the UK.

6 years ago
793
Nigel Farage

The Sociology of Brexit

Public conversations about Britain’s EU membership could have involved wide-ranging discussions of British and European politics, economics and society, argues our Daniel Nehring. They did not. Instead, they were dominated by oversimplifications, stereotypes and lies.

6 years ago
1517

Migrants Ate My Guinea Pig

German-born Daniel Nehring insists that the upcoming Brexit vote is founded less on reason and more on xenophobia, and argues that the toxic atmosphere surrounding the vote is already doing harm to Britain’s fabled academic enterprise.

6 years ago
769