International Debate

Blog posts and resources relating to International issues. To start a new discussion on international issues, visit the forum via the above link.

Extreme Polarization Is Bad But Need Not Be Inevitable

Are Americans now stuck in animosity and anger that will undermine democracy, or can the nation pull out of it? Here, Jennifer McCoy shares some of the findings of a collaborative research project she led that examined political polarization in 11 countries, including the United States. Their research shows that the most democratic of actions – participating in elections – is exactly the thing to do to help reduce polarization.

12 months ago
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Puck partisanship cartoon

Even Self-Identified Independents are Partisan in America

According to the Gallup polling firm, writes Christopher Devine, the identity that people choose most often is actually “independent” – not Democratic or Republican. In 2017, 42 percent of Americans chose this label – up from the low 30s just 14 years ago, in 2004. However, three-quarters of these “independents” admit, when asked, that they lean toward favoring the Democratic or Republican Party.

12 months ago
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Paul Johnson at lecture

Economist Paul Johnson Says the Known Knowns Are Killing Us

Paul Johnson had one key theme in his SAGE Publishing lecture for the Campaign for Social Science: Long-term policy needs to be developed across government based on a broad understanding of the social and economic trends. And there is little evidence that this lesson is being heeded.

12 months ago
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#MeToo: Tackling Harassment in Academic Publishing

The #MeToo movement has slowly spread across to other sectors as people begin to come forward with their own stories of sexual harassment and bullying. In academic publishing, this conversation was in part started in February by Alison’s Mudditt’s powerful post on The Scholarly Kitchen. Muddit chaired a recent panel looking at sexual harassment, and ways to combat it, at the annual ALPSP conference.

1 year ago
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open peer review concept

Open Peer Review Not Always Welcomed With Open Arms

It’s hoped open peer review could improve the speed and quality of reviews, but, not all academics are comfortable with open peer review and remain fearful of their comments and views being subject to public scrutiny. Jaime A. Teixeira da Silva argues this may prevent the open review system from being truly inclusive.

1 year ago
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Social Science Research Council

Collaboration Imbues SSRC’s ‘To Secure Knowledge’ Report

In launching its first-ever task force report on Monday, the 95-year-old Social Science Research Council made clear it gets by with a little help from its friends. Collaboration, said sociologist Alondra Nelson Nelson, the president of the SSRC, is the byword of the report, To Secure Knowledge: Social Science Partnerships for the Common Good.

1 year ago
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How-researchers-regard-peer-review

Survey: Peer Reviewed Valued – If Someone Else Does It

During this Peer Review Week 2018, Tom Culley shares findings from the new Publons “Global State of Peer Review” report. As demands on the peer review system increase, reviewers are actually becoming less responsive to invitations.

1 year ago
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Crowd-Sourcing As a Complement to Peer Review

A new process developed by Princeton’s Matthew Salganik for reviewing academic manuscripts allows the world at large to examine and weigh in on a book at the same time the manuscript is undergoing peer review.

1 year ago
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How Will Universities Cope With Brexit Britain’s Resurgent Nationalism?

As Brexit Britain appears headed straight for a chaotic exit from the European Union, its universities are raising questions about their future with growing alarm. The consequences which post-Brexit nationalism will have for universities, students, and scholars are hardly being discussed at all.

1 year ago
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Diane Reay

Diane Reay on Education and Class

One thing has become clear to sociologist Diane Reay across her research – “It’s primarily working-class children who turn out to be losers in the educational system.” Whether it’s through the worst-funded schools, least-qualified teachers, most-temporary teaching arrangements or narrowest curricula, students from working class backgrounds in the United Kingdom (and the United States) draw the shortest educational straws.

1 year ago
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