Bookshelf

Book Review: Unequal Time: Gender, Class, and Family in Employment Schedules

July 3, 2015 1002

41m6FqkS71L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Unequal Time: Gender, Class, and Family in Employment Schedules. By Dan Clawson Naomi Gerstel . New York: The Russell Sage Foundation, 2014. 324 pp. ISBN 978-0-87154-014-0, $35 (Paperback).

Matthew M. Piszczek of University of Wisconsin Oshkosh recently reviewed the book by Dan Clawson and Naomi Gerstel in ILR Review.

From the review:

Work schedules are a critical factor in the management of time, but schedules vary significantly from one person to the next. Most commonly, schedules are ILR_72ppiRGB_powerpointstudied through the variables of employee schedule control and typical hours worked. In Unequal Time, Clawson and Gerstel go far beyond this treatment and expand the domain of work schedule research into the “web of time.” The web of time is an interesting and much-needed expansion on the conceptualization of work schedules that aptly recognizes the limitations of more typical perspectives. The web of time approach allows the authors to look more deeply into how schedules are created and negotiated, not only between employees and organizations but also between employees and their coworkers and spouses. Similarly, the authors explain the effect of employee schedules and schedule unpredictability on others in the broader web of time. By focusing on themes of unpredictability, the authors identify several critical factors that employees and organizations consider in the creation and maintenance of work schedules that are often overlooked in organizational research and that push the domain of schedule research a big theoretical step forward.

You can read the review from ILR Review for free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Like what you read? Click here to sign up for e-alerts and get all the latest research and reviews sent directly to your inbox!

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