Month: September 2017

question-marks

What Can You Tell Us about Networks Today?

Sara Miller McCune, the founder of SAGE Publishing, has a question for the Social Science Space community: What does more recent research (especially research from the 21st century, and/or research taking into account the influence of social media) tell us about networks?

2 years ago
51
WhySocialScience logo_

Why Social Science? It Makes Computing Work for People

Andrew Bernat is the executive director of the Computing Research Association. He will participate in a congressional briefing on “Social Science Solutions for Health, Public Safety, Computing, and Other National Priorities” on October 4, 2017.

2 years ago
73

Ann Sloan Devlin on Timeless and Dynamic Research Design

New technology has, and is, changing a lot of the mechanics of social and behavioral science research, but how much is the underlying enterprise itself changing as a result? This is a key question Ann Sloan Devlin, author of the newly released ‘The Research Experience: Planning, Conducting, and Reporting Research,’ addresses in this interview.

2 years ago
77
WhySocialScience logo_

Why Social Science? To Improve the Public’s Health

William “Bill” Riley is the director of the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research at the National Institutes of Health. He will participate in a congressional briefing on “Social Science Solutions for Health, Public Safety, Computing, and Other National Priorities” on October 4. Here he explains why he feels public health is best served by good social and behavioral science.

2 years ago
229
Piltdown headline

Peer Review: The ‘Least Worst’ Barrier to Bad Science

Having worked in academia for the past 30 years and currently serving as vice president of the Academy of Science of South Africa, Brenda Wingfield says she believes peer review and the publication process is perhaps more important than ever in this era of ‘fake news’ – and not just for scientists and academics.

2 years ago
64

Is Academe Now Privileging Click-bait Over Rigor?

Portia Roelofs and Max Gallien cite Bruce Gilley’s defense of colonialism paper published earlier this month to illustrate how deliberately provocative articles have the capacity to hack academia, to privilege clicks and attention over rigor in research.

2 years ago
61
Econ question wordcloud

Do Women Count in Economics?

By one estimate of U.S. universities, there are about 300,000 fewer women students in the field of economics than there should be if sexism were not so rampant.

2 years ago
63
Croc gambling study authors_opt

Ig Nobel Aside, Our Gambling Research Was No Croc

On the surface studying how gamblers reacted to playing a poker machine while holding a live crocodile sounds, well, silly. But the goal — to learn how to get gamblers to say ‘when’ — is deadly serious business.

2 years ago
243
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