Year: 2018

Equipped report

New Report Packages Themes from Evidence Week

“The question we must therefore ask is: are we all really working to the best available picture of what is going on in the world?” So asks a new report that summarizes the themes discussed in June’s first-ever Evidence Week.

3 years ago
483
Eddie Bernice Johnson

Washington and Social Science: The Midterms and Science Committees

The change in majority control for the U.S. House of Representatives will change the discussions that have occurred around U.S. social science funding as a party that has been openly skeptical of the value of social and behavioral research will no longer pull the strings on funding science.

3 years ago
593

Social Science Data Solving Social Housing Problems

The ESRC describes Knowledge Transfer Partnerships as a relationship between a company/organization and staff in a knowledge base institution in which the the institution’s knowledge base is applied to a challenge presented by the organization. Here, Farida Mustafazade describes her experience in such a partnership.

3 years ago
737

Extreme Polarization Is Bad But Need Not Be Inevitable

Are Americans now stuck in animosity and anger that will undermine democracy, or can the nation pull out of it? Here, Jennifer McCoy shares some of the findings of a collaborative research project she led that examined political polarization in 11 countries, including the United States. Their research shows that the most democratic of actions – participating in elections – is exactly the thing to do to help reduce polarization.

3 years ago
1445
Puck partisanship cartoon

Even Self-Identified Independents are Partisan in America

According to the Gallup polling firm, writes Christopher Devine, the identity that people choose most often is actually “independent” – not Democratic or Republican. In 2017, 42 percent of Americans chose this label – up from the low 30s just 14 years ago, in 2004. However, three-quarters of these “independents” admit, when asked, that they lean toward favoring the Democratic or Republican Party.

3 years ago
770
Paul Johnson at lecture

Economist Paul Johnson Says the Known Knowns Are Killing Us

Paul Johnson had one key theme in his SAGE Publishing lecture for the Campaign for Social Science: Long-term policy needs to be developed across government based on a broad understanding of the social and economic trends. And there is little evidence that this lesson is being heeded.

3 years ago
524
CQ election logo

Election IQ: Bringing the 2018 Midterms into the Classroom

At SAGE, we believe that education and engaged scholarship make up the foundation of a healthy society. So for this election season, we challenge you to bring the election into your classrooms. For the next few days, we will be providing you with new content to help facilitate conversation within the classroom.

3 years ago
563
Nick Adams

Nick Adams on Textual Analysis

Fake news, whether truly phony or merely unpalatable, has become an inescapable trope for modern media consumers. But apart from its propagandist provenance, misinformation and disinformation in our media diets is a genuine threat. Sociologist Nick Adams, in this Social Science Bites podcast, offers hope that a tool he’s developed can improve the media literacy of the populace.

3 years ago
1966
Gladstone House British Academy_opt

Wolfson Foundation Funds £10 Million HSS Initiative With British Academy

Making its largest-ever grant in the social sciences and humanities, the Wolfson Foundation awarded the British Academy £10 million to promote high quality research. Under the initiative, the British Academy will create a fellowship program to support early career researchers, develop an international community of scholars and create an intellectual hub at the academy’s London home on Carlton House Terrace.

3 years ago
470