Month: February 2020

Free Webinar: How To Get Published!

What can I do to increase the chances of having my paper accepted? How long does it take for an article to get published? Who are good contacts to reach out to for more information about my article along the way? How can I play a role in the dissemination of my paper? Our free webinar will guide you through the author journey, from beginning to end. Featuring Jessica Lipowski, Publishing Editor at SAGE, and a panel of Editors-in-Chief from various disciplines, including management, medicine, and health, this webinar will break down each step of the process and detail best practices for authors or those who want to be authors, as well as answer your questions about the process.

1 month ago
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AAPSS Names Five 2020 Fellows

Swelling its total roll call of fellows to 140 elected in the past two decades, the directors of the American Academy of Political and Social Science have elected five distinguished scholars to be inducted as fellows of the AAPSS. Katherine Cramer, Eric Foner, Helen Milner, Mario Small, and Bruce Western will be inducted at a ceremony in October.

1 month ago
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A Renaissance Primer on Academic Writing

Stoyan V. Sgourev, possibly the only management professor teaching (and indulging in) art history, argues that many of the key principles that guided the evolution of painting during the Italian Renaissance can be usefully applied to the domain of academic writing. Leonardo quite likely never intended to articulate advice on writing as an intellectual activity, but Stoyan borrows generously from his style and writings in formulating a number of basic principles that can help connect with the reader in a similar way to his paintings.

1 month ago
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Building a Digital Archive of Centuries of Records about Enslaved Peoples

Paper documents are still priceless records of the past, even in a digital world. Primary sources stored in local archives throughout Latin America, for example, describe a centuries-old multiethnic society grappling with questions of race, class and religion.

However, paper archives are vulnerable to…

1 month ago
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padlock on a gate

Jargon May Be Even Worse for Communicating Complexity Than You Thought

Jargon, a specialized language or set of expressions used by a specific group, is by its nature exclusionary, so it’s likely no surprise that scientific, technical or legal jargon may leave outsiders in the cold. A series of studies from researchers at Ohio State University suggests that jargon may turn off people well beyond an offending passage, and that one popular way to soften any harm – using jargon but immediately defining it – may not work.

1 month ago
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What Social Factors Stop Students from Taking Internships?

When her college started requiring students to complete an internship in order to graduate, it created a serious dilemma for Janelle.

“I wouldn’t be able to do classes, do the internship and work to make money – which is kind of important because I’m basically just paying for school as I can,” Janelle said in an interview for a study of internships during her junior year in South Carolina…

2 months ago
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Unleashing the Opportunity of Research in Latin America

An upward trend in the productivity of Latin American researchers, increased collaboration between them and scholars from other regions, and societal, cultural, and economic characteristics all make Latin America an ideal “natural laboratory” to build and test management theories.

2 months ago
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