Communication

Blog posts and resources relating to social science communication. To start a new discussion on communication, visit the forum via the above link.

stack of academic journals

Literature Reviews Are Already Broken, So Let’s Kill Them

The literature review is a staple of the scholarly article. But when reviews misrepresent previous studies or suggest there’s a paucity of information when there isn’t, doesn’t,this degrade the knowledge base? Richard P. Phelps argues that, given the difficulty of verifying an author’s claims during peer review, it is best that journals drop the requirement for a literature review in scholarly articles.

2 years ago
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Report: Math Skills Increasingly Important for Social Science Grads

A new report from Britain’s Campaign for Social Science, Positive Prospects: Careers for Social Scientists and Why Data and Number Skills Matter, argues that at least for the social sciences, graduates in the United Kingdom can find work and will make as much as the body of physical science and technology graduates that are held up as the most marketable.

2 years ago
251

Transforming Research into an Illustrated Abstract

Publishing research that can be accessed as widely as possible is clearly crucial, but ensuring that research is accessible to similarly large groups of people is an altogether different challenge. Lucy Lambe explains how the LSE Library has worked with a comics creator and illustrator to create illustrated abstracts of articles that were funded to publish open access last year.

2 years ago
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The Value of Big Data Creation

How do firms transform big data and why do firms differ in their abilities to create value from big data? in a research article that tries to find answers to these questions. Jing Zeng and Keith Glaister find “it is not the data itself, or individual data scientists, that generate value creation opportunities. Rather, value creation occurs through the process of data management.”

2 years ago
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Free speech zone

The US Professoriat and the Limits of Free Speech

Researches at the University of Florida’s Brechner Center for Freedom of Information have studied the rights of public employees when they speak with the news media. Here, they look specifically at professors at public universities in the United States and find there are broad protections – within limits.

2 years ago
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WomenEd cartoon

Ten Recommended Resources for Women in Academia

In our second post for 2018’s Academic Book Week, we wanted to take the opportunity to highlight some of the fantastic resources available to help support, encourage and develop women in academia. From blogs to books, to influential social media accounts and reports, the literature out there is both vast and dynamic.

2 years ago
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Scene from odyssey

The ‘Odyssey’ of Today’s Leadership Crisis

Centuries ago, myths helped the Greeks learn to reject tyrannical authority and identify the qualities of good leadership. Emily Anhalt argues that the same myths that long predate the world’s very first democracy have lessons for us today – just as they did for the ancient Greeks centuries ago.

2 years ago
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Information overload

Humans Broke the Internet. Understanding Them Better Might Help Fix It

This stark contrast between the internet’s light and dark sides has become a defining characteristic of the digital age, writes Timo Hannay founder SchoolDash, but is not an inevitable consequence of the mostly innocuous technologies on which it’s built. Rather, it is the product of their bewilderingly diverse and eccentric user base – otherwise known as humanity.

2 years ago
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Speakezee Platform Matches Experts With the Curious Public

Speakezee, a labor of love by experimental psychologist Bruce Hood, connects willing experts and curious audiences. Now in it’s third year, the platform has a roster of more than 2,000 scientists in 32 countries ready discuss their research with schoolchildren, big companies, support groups, service clubs and anyone else now comfortable enough to ask for a presentation.

2 years ago
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Filling out a survey

Survey Asks Questions About Scholarly Journal Use

In the latest iteration of a survey series she’s been running for four decades, Carol Tenopir aims to assess the value of access to scholarly journals by examining patterns of use and reading. Your input is sought.

2 years ago
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Are Ethnographers Ever Wrong?

Steven Lubet, the author of ‘Interrogating Ethnography: Why Evidence Matters,’ explains the importance of his approach to investigating the discipline — to ‘put it on trial’ — and to reiterate the idea that accuracy matters in social science. Spurring on his restatement is a recent review on Social Science Space that Lubet argues missed his point entirely.

2 years ago
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