Academic Freedom

In Search of Conservative Sociology

As sociology has drifted further and further from any conservative touchstones, argues Robert Dingwall, it has become less and less able to understand the society that provides its subsistence.

3 years ago
403
common-rule-participants

Common Rule Reform – A Botched Job

The rush to publish a revised Common Rule for federally funded human research in the United States has created a flawed regulatory regime, says Robert Dingwall., Time to tear the whole edifice down and start over, he suggests.

3 years ago
83

In Defense of the Trigger Warning

A literature professor who has offered ‘trigger warnings’ to students argues that the warnings are designed to open up a discussion of difficult material – not suppress it.

3 years ago
115

Intellectual Autonomy, Intellectual Property and the New Enclosures

If the public institution is committed to public interest, then privatization of research and teaching cannot be allowed. Work done should be seen, heard and critiqued. Innovation in knowledge can come when people take away ideas from us, just as we did. Research should be made public, accountable and responsible. The data commons in public interest cannot be sacrificed at the altar of intellectual autonomy.

3 years ago
51
Humanities books

Archived Webinar: Librarians and the Freedom to Read

Last month the webinar “Battling Bannings- Authors discuss intellectual freedom and the freedom to read” saw Index on Censorship’s Vicky Baker moderate a discussion between historian Wendy Doniger and children’s book authors Christine Baldacchino and Jessica Herthel.

3 years ago
22
Black sheep

Take Away Tenure, and Professors Become Sheep

Alice Dreger says shecan see clearly that universities in which the majority of the faculty feel unsafe in terms of job security become places where no one feels safe to do anything that might risk upsetting someone.

3 years ago
35

The Financialisation of Academic Knowledge Production

As part of our series on academic freedom, Dylan Kerrigan discusses the wider implications of the financialisation of academic knowledge production by considering academic book publishing. He asks if the success of academic books is best measured by economic or non-economic criteria, by its impact on the business sector or its veracity, by ideological myth-making or evidence.

3 years ago
83
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