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UK backs Social Science, the World benefitsSo Much Noise: Are Academics being Over-Branded?Making Sense of Crime TrendsIn praise of Sociology! Speech by Pierre BourdieuPaletleme Amirliği – Şubat 2013 « Emrah Göker'in İstifhanesi Recent comment authors

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[…] Numerical indigestion: how much data is really good for us? Share and Enjoy: This entry was posted in Academic Funding, Featured, Higher Education Reform and tagged Acad, Administrative Data Taskforce, AHRC, and Skills, Birth Cohort, Birth Cohort Studies, British Government, Campaign for Social Science, Coalition, David Willetts, Department of Business, Diana Kuh, Economic and Developmental Demography, employment data, ESRC, FE data, HE data, Heather Joshi, innovation, Longi, Making the Case for the Social Sciences, National Science Foundation, NRC Unit of Lifelong Health and Ageing, Polly Toynbee, SAGE, Social Mobility Transparency Board, social science, Universities and Science, Ziyad Marar. Bookmark… Read more »

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[…] Science’s Dangerously Low Profile, and How to Fix It Numerical indigestion: how much data is really good for us? To build a successful academic career, you need to play by the rules. Showmanship and The […]

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[…] Pressures The Myths of Offender Profiling. The Formula Numerical indigestion: how much data is really good for us? Share and Enjoy: This entry was posted in Featured, Impact, International Debate, News, Public […]

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[…] Numerical indigestion: how much data is really good for us? Share and Enjoy: This entry was posted in Featured, International Debate, News, Science & Social Science and tagged Bourdieu, Gold Medal of the National Center for Scientific Research, social science, Social Scientist, sociology. Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL. « The Politics of Attacking Political Science […]

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[…] Numerical indigestion: how much data is really good for us? Big Data: Benefit to Society, or Drowning in a Data Deluge? Money Degrades Our Ability to Empathize Danny Dorling on Inequality Share and Enjoy: This entry was posted in Featured, Impact, International Debate, News, Research Methods and tagged CIA, Economic Justice, Gini Coefficient, Gini Index, income, Income inequality, inequality, Jon Stewart, Namibia, Nigeria, Occupy Wall St., Research Index, social science, statistics, World Bank. Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL. « Campaign for Social Science to hold latest roadshows […]

David Walker
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Can I underline three of Harvey Goldstein’s points: a) all ‘professional’ data users, especially social scientists, should be pro active and play a leading part in checking the presentation and use of public statistics. This may entail identifying gaps and demanding data. b) putting our shoulders to the wheel and trying to raise standards of public debate and public literacy in data. The new Nuffield/ESRC/Hefce initative on quantitative methods in undergraduate social science is blazing a trail. Shouldn’t all social scientists (and historians) be required to possess a minimal level of statistical literacy before they are allowed to graduate –… Read more »

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