Inequality

Danny Dorling

Book Review: Injustice: Why Social Inequality Still Persists

The revised edition of Danny Dorling’s book ‘Injustice: Why Social Inequality Still Persists,’ provides an analysis of contemporary issues and practices underpinning inequality and a concise interpretation of the main causes of the persistence of injustice in rich countries, together with possible solutions.

4 years ago
4
Hands holding dollars

Perceived Gaps in Equity Affect Decisions More Than Absolute Gaps

The absolute difference between what someone else is getting compared to what you get matters less than how feel about any disparity, according to a review of ‘relative deprivation’ research in the journal ‘Policy Insights from the Brain and Behavioral Sciences.’

4 years ago
5

It’s Time to Take the Measure of Social Mobility

Despite its obsession with the concept of equal opportunity, the United States hasn’t actively monitored its residents’ social mobility for more than four decades. Now a group of social scientists have proposed an efficient way using existing tools to chart mobility.

5 years ago
5
Angus Deaton

Angus Deaton on Health and Inequality

Angus Deaton is a social scientist and the author of The Great Escape: Health, Wealth and the Origins of Inequality. His Princeton colleague, the philosopher Peter Singer, argues that aid is vital to combat the terrible mortality rates in some countries. Angus Deaton disagrees..

6 years ago
36

Property Crime, Violence and Recession

There is no inevitability in the rise in homicide, domestic and acquaintance violence in the coming year. Sadly, though, it would be more surprising if they did not increase than if they did.

6 years ago
7

The Formula

How an equation cooked up by Mussolini’s numbers guy came to define how we think about inequality—from Occupy Wall Street to the World Bank to the billionaires at Davos—and why it’s time to find a new way of looking at the numbers.

7 years ago
15

Economic Inequality and Political Power (Part 3 of 3)

Faith in the wisdom of the affluent to guide public policy has been sorely tested by the enormous costs in money and human suffering resulting from the Great Recession. My data cast further doubt on the notion that representational inequality arises from the greater knowledge or better judgment of those with higher incomes.

7 years ago
5
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