Robert Dingwall

Robert Dingwall is a consulting sociologist, providing research and advisory services particularly in relation to organizational strategy, public engagement and knowledge transfer. He is co-editor of the SAGE Handbook of Research Management.

Walter Wyckoff

Return to Planet Quantophrenia

Robert Dingwall argues that numeracy and and a grasp of quantitative method of course have a place in the education of a social scientist, but they shouldn’t be the only skills in the graduate’s quiver. How about he ability to walk around, for one?

6 years ago
537
Quantophrenia

Quantophrenia is Back in Town

Many social scientists find themselves members of a cult of quantification, argues Robert Dingwall, in love with numbers for their own sake even when those numbers produce no useful knowledge.

6 years ago
514

Tamiflu and the Ethics of the British Medical Journal

No one expected Tamiflu to be a wonder drug, but indications are that it’s moderately useful in fighting a serious public health threat. But that message was lost last week in an ill-starred rush to beat up on ‘wicked’ Big Pharma, argues Robert Dingwall.

6 years ago
719
Human testing

Publication Ethics and Biomedical Imperialism

Applying ethics to social science research can raise as many issues as it answers. A new set of guidelines on which Robert DIngwall consulted gives clarity in some cases like manipulation of images and duplicate publication but leaves some other controversies unsettled.

6 years ago
202
2003 flood of Somerset Levels

Floods, Politics and Science: The Case of the Somerset Levels

Feel-good interventions that don’t provide a practical good, or at least one not supported by evidence, generate questions that hinge specifically on future responses to climate change and more broadly on government decision-making in general.

6 years ago
533

The Ethics of Impact

Back in the summer, John Holmwood, the current BSA President, sent me an email about impact and research ethics. Various […]

7 years ago
361

The Rule of Optimism – Thirty Years On

Not many social scientists introduce a phrase into the English language and its subsequent history is instructive about the ways in which the impact of successful sociology becomes invisible. It is also a nice example of how ideas become assimilated into a societal environment that finds it hard to accept the sociologist’s focus on systems and organizations.

7 years ago
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Who Really, Really Wants Open Access?

There is broad agreement is the desirability of wider access by readers to scholarly journal articles. There is less agreement on who these imagined readers might be.

7 years ago
244