The Social And Behavioral Response To Coronavirus​

With the spread of the novel coronavirus and its attendant COVID-19 outbreak, social and behavioral science is being deployed to assuage fears, understand risk, improve public health and implement social distancing strategies. These articles and resources seek to assist in that educational effort.

Flatten the curve

Migrating to Online Teaching in Real-Time

Moving Online Huge Challenge for Kenya’s Higher Education

For over a decade Kenya has made moves towards e-learning for university students. This is all the more important now, as universities have closed indefinitely due to the COVID-19 pandemic. But questions remain as to how effective it is. Jackline Nyerere shares her insights.

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University students in classroom

Higher Education During COVID and Thereafter: Considerations for India and the Developing World

The current crisis we are encountering, as a result of COVID-19, should enable the appropriation of the current system of delivery and assessment in higher education. Technology integration, undeniably, remains essential for the modernization of education in India and other countries in the developing world. At the same time, such efforts should take into consideration of socio-economic factors, including region-specific issues and student diversity.

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AERA Offering Methods, Comms Professional Development Series

Even amid a pandemic academics have an ongoing need and desire for professional development, and the American Educational Research Association has responded by offering a virtual academy. The Virtual Research Learning Series offers nine four-hour courses, the first starting on May 19 and the ninth in mid-September.

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Student Perspectives on the Online Teaching Landscape

Under the threat of coronavirus, many universities took early initiative to empty their campuses and transition to online classroom spaces. […]

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What’s That, You Want to Run an Online Experiment?

This post will explore some of the tools and platforms that can help with a key stage of the online research process: creating your survey or experiment. Specifically, we’ll be looking at options for running online experiments, with a slight focus on the more complex platforms – those designed to collect reaction time data (e.g., cognitive tasks), or to deliver complex experimental paradigms with a range of response types. We’ll examine the pros and cons of Qualtrics, Gorilla, Inquisit Web, as well as the good old DIY approach.

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Sherman Center mural digital heads

Mark Carrigan Asks If We’re All Digital Scholars Now?

The lockdown prompted by the COVID pandemic presents opportunities to rethink how academic practices take place in virtual environments. Mark Carrigan argues that if adopted uncritically, they could exacerbate existing inequalities in the use of digital technologies and open up new areas of academic life to surveillance and control.

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Here’s Four Weird Artifacts of Video Conferencing

People have long noticed, however, that some peculiar things happen in videoconferencing. Norm Friesen, and educational technology researcher, has explored this and presents four odd things that happen when you’re engaged in a videoconference.

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Wildebeest migration

Four Tech Tips For Students Whose Classes Moved Online

Yes, there has been a mad rush to get classes online. If you’ve found yourself having to study your university course online, here are some ways to ensure you’re ready for your virtual experience.

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Five Tips for Designing Remote or Asynchronous Learning

Rather than thinking about learning as something that always has to happen together in a classroom or even “together” online, virtual learning provides us with a wonderful opportunity to rethink personalized learning through asynchronous teaching. So here are some best practices from the K-12 milieu to consider as you create these learning experiences for your students.

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Plans A and B crossed out

The Best Laid Plans… Qualitative Research Design During COVID-19

In this moment of the global COVID-19 pandemic, the ideas of emergent design and researcher and design responsiveness take on new meaning and import; they can serve, methods expert Sharon Ravitch argues, to connect more traditional qualitative methods with participatory frameworks and critical and humanizing methodologies.

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Active Online Learning

I was an early adopter for online teaching and learning. My experience teaching, developing courses, and consulting about e-learning morphed […]

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Making a Sudden Transition to Teaching Online: Suggestions and Resources

Editor’s Note: As a means of supporting those attempting to do their best under trying circumstances, SAGE Publishing has drawn […]

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16 Answers to Your Questions about Teaching Online

The call for ‘social distancing’ in the wake of the coronavirus and its attendant COVID-19 disease has seen schools and universities around the world hurriedly attempting to turn their physical classrooms into virtual ones. While this may be best immediate reaction from an epidemiological point of view, from a pedagogic perspective, it has left instructors desperately trying to retrofit and reformat their courses while trying not to unduly disadvantage large numbers of their students. As a means of supporting those attempting to do their best under trying circumstances, SAGE Publishing has drawn from its large body of published and peer-reviewed research to offer the resources below — free of charge — to serve teachers and students around the world.

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Higher Education’s COVID-19 Online Pivot: Students

Most of the articles and advice out there about quickly switching to online education in the wake of COVID-19 is aimed at educators, but we should bear in mind that it is an unfamiliar experience for many students, too.

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25 years of edtech cover remixed

Higher Education’s COVID-19 Online Pivot: Institutions

The outbreak of COVID-19 has seen many universities closing campuses and shifting learning online. It’s unprecedented and suddenly puts ed tech front and center in a way it hasn’t been before. For those of us who have been doing online learning or distance ed for a while it can seem a bit irritating to have been seen as second class for so long and then suddenly deemed worthy of interest. So here’s some useful bits for those without that pedigree.

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14 Tips for Improving Your Online Teaching

Hundreds of thousands of teachers are busy working to move their face-to-face lessons online. Designing online courses takes significant time and effort.
Right now, however, we need a simpler formula. Here are 14 quick tips to make online teaching better, from an expert in online learning.

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Instantly Shifting Classes Online Is Not Trivial

Carefully implemented, online learning can make university education more accessible, affordable, interactive and student-centered. However, the way that it is being presented as a simple and practical solution to coronavirus fears, capable of replacing face-to-face teaching for a significant period, is misleading.

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Are Online and Blended Classes a Good Fit for Management Education?

Online and blended (both online and in classroom) courses are becoming more and more popular as time goes on. According […]

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Status List of 2020 Social Science Conference Cancellations

Status List of 2020 Social and Behavioral Science Conferences Amid concerns about the spread of the new coronavirus and its […]

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Applying Social and Behavioral Insights

Collective Behavior in the Time of COVID-19

We are frequently told that COVID-19 is the greatest challenge of our generation, and perhaps the largest global crisis since World War II. So, what do we know about how people behave in crises? And how can we apply that understanding to manage the current pandemic?

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Social Order and Disorder in Time of COVID: Excerpt from ‘Together Apart’

The way we are treated by the police tells us where we stand in society; if this treatment confirms the broader injustices to which our group has been subjected, then everything falls apart.

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Solidarity In the Midst of COVID: Excerpt from ‘Together Apart’

Pandemics inspire the most remarkable acts of unity and compassion (Solnit, 2009). They also lead to appalling acts of division […]

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Crowds and COVID: Excerpt from ‘Together Apart’

It is not surprising that in the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, aside from infection fears, gatherings of people on beaches, public transport and in parks were met with concern and even alarm. Crowds are associated with trouble. But crowds can be both destructive and constructive forces.

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Managing Crowds in Crises: Excerpt from ‘Together Apart’

In an excerpt from Together Apart, three officials with Public Health England argue that he consequences of shared identity, which have been shown to be so important in building an effective community response to the pandemic — the mutual trust, influence and support — are equally important when it comes to community–authority relations.

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Looking at Emergencies and Disasters During COVID: Excerpt from ‘Together Apart’

While the pandemic is different other emergencies, there are important similarities: there is a mortal threat which can create fear; there is not enough protection for everyone under threat; and human action can mitigate (or exacerbate) that threat.

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How Behavioral Sciences Could Help More With COVID-19

Countries across the world have been turning to behavioral science in the fight against coronavirus. In May, The New Scientist proclaimed that ‘behavioral […]

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Together Apart cover detail_opt

Addressing the Psychology of ‘Together Apart’: Free Book Download

Given the import of its subject matter, SAGE Publishing (the parent of Social Science Space) had agreed to make an e-book o the psychology of COVID-19 freely available.

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We Know Little About How Data Viz Affects Our COVID Perceptions

The language of data visualisation has become commonplace, and data visualisations are widely used to communicate about the pandemic to the public. However, as Helen Kennedy observes, their power to influence the public is still little understood.

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An Ethnographer on ‘Reopen’ Protests

The “anti-lockdown” and #Reopen protests in the U.S. have powerful and secretive backers, but there are real Americans on the […]

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Gyms, Bars, Cafes– We’ve Lost A Certain Intimacy In Society

Social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic implies many painful losses. Among them are so-called “third places” – the restaurants, bars, […]

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New Orleans after levee break

Emergencies: Why Do We Leave It So Late?

David Canter considers the social psychological processes that turn emergencies into disasters.

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Second PIBBS cover

A Collection: Behavioral Science Insights on Addressing COVID’s Collateral Effects

To help in decisions surrounding the effects and aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic, the the journal ‘Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ offers this collection of articles as a free resource.

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Hetan Shah on Social Science and the Pandemic

The current pandemic has and will continue to mutate the social landscape of the world, but amid the lost lives […]

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science v corona scientists

Q&A About the Science versus Corona Initiative

Scientists at the University of Amsterdam started two platforms. Data versus Corona and Strategies versus Corona, as part of a larger initiative to unite experts from different disciplines to join together in the fight against the coronavirus.

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Student Perspectives on the Online Teaching Landscape

Under the threat of coronavirus, many universities took early initiative to empty their campuses and transition to online classroom spaces. […]

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British Academy logo

British Academy Mobilizing Community to Address COVID Impacts

And so the British Academy has begun mobilizing its community of social scientists and humanities scholars to support the United Kingdom’s government and its populace as they fight the COVID pandemic today and deal with its impacts tomorrow.

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Infectious Diseases and Long-Run Innovation Consequences

Today we welcome two scholars from Texas’s Baylor University whose research into how pathogens affect innovation has taken on new prominence in the wake of the current pandemic.

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Monash University logo

How COVID-19 is Changing the World: Views from Monash University

This article, first published in the Monash Lens at Monash University, gathers input from a cross-disciplinary group of social and behavioral scientists and members of the humanities faculty at the Australian university.

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Activity diary exampl

How Researchers, Instructors, and Students Can Practice Wellbeing During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Social and behavioral research suggests many ways to calm your anxiety and practice well-being during this time of many unknowns. SAGE Publishing, the parent of Social Science Space, has opened various resources to support not only your own emotional health, but also the health of those around you, such as your children, students, and colleagues.

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Technological Considerations for Training Human Service Professionals in Light of COVID-19: Opportunity for Appropriation

The appropriate training of human service professionals in digital platforms — entailing retrospection, revisions, and appropriation of the curriculum and training frameworks with an emphasis on the integration of technology with practice — can ensure the quality of services to the clients during emergencies like COVID-19.

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Ebola-signs-and-symptoms

Behavioral Science Proves its Worth in Tackling Viruses

The World Health Organization’s Outbreak Communications Planning Guide suggests behavior changes can reduce the spread or a viral disease by as much as 80 percent. This can mean the difference between healthcare sectors being overwhelmed or continuing to function.

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You Might Be Feeling Tired on Lockdown. Here’s Why.

A lot of people have been posting on social media saying they have been feeling tired earlier than usual while […]

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The 7 Deadly Sins of Coronavirus Thinking

The answer for the kind of panicked flurry in reasoning we’re seeing during the COVID-19 pandemic may lie in a field of critical thinking called vice epistemology. This theory argues our thinking habits and intellectual character traits cause poor reasoning.

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Why Call It ‘Social Distancing’? We Need Social Connection More Than Ever

Staying socially connected in times of threat has benefits beyond helping us manage our mental well-being. Other people can provide us with practical support, like picking up groceries or passing on relevant information, as well as emotional support. This feeling is called social solidarity, and if we get it right we’ll be much better equipped to respond to this and other crises.

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Simon Kneebone illustration

Evaluation Implications of the Coronavirus Emergency

Michael Quinn Patton, a giant in the field of evaluation, has been getting queries from colleagues young and old, novice evaluators and long-time practitioners, asking how he’s making sense of the global health emergency and what I think the implications may be for evaluation. Her’s his take on where we are and what it means.

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Couple wearing facemasks

Behavior Changed, Yes, But Only After COVID Was At Doorstep

Research explains the relatively late behavioral reaction to the information of COVID-19 in Europe, writes Joan Costa-Font

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Solo figure in parking lot

LSE Impact: Social Science in a Time of Social Distancing

Social science, argues Michael Taster of the LSE Impact blog, has an important role to play, by directly contributing to policy surrounding COVID-19 and its impacts, but also by acting as a critical friend, which raises the urgent question: how can this wealth of knowledge and expertise best be communicated?

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How to Stay Connected in a Time of Physical Distancing

Psychological scientists at the University of Washington’s Center for the Science of Social Connection draw from their clinical and research experiences help us understand the side effects of social distancing and suggest strategies for addressing them.

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Tips from Behavioral Science to Flatten the Curve on COVID Anxiety

Although feeling anxiety in response to a threat is a normal human reaction, sustained high anxiety can undermine constructive responses to the crisis. The following suggestions, based on psychological science, can help you deal with coronavirus anxiety.

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Links between myths and facts

Learn From COVID-19 Myths – Don’t Just Debunk Them

Instead of viewing rumors and myths as misperceptions that can be suppressed with accurate information, we should treat them as opportunities to understand — and respond to — the legitimate anxieties of the people who adopt and share them. In other words, we should look at them as valuable feedback that can help improve our own reporting and messaging.

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Jamil Zaki

We Should Talk About ‘Distant Socializing’ Instead of ‘Social Distancing’

The same technologies that people once blamed for tearing society apart might be our best chance of staying together during the COVID-19 outbreak, says Stanford’s Jamil Zaki.

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Why Are People Hoarding Toilet Paper?

The other day I went into Costco to buy some toilet paper. It came as a small shock when I […]

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Empty Grocery Shelves! Are Supply Chains Resilient Enough?

Toilet paper shortages, profiteering from hand sanitizer and empty shelves in grocery stores. Thanks to COVID-19, governments in most industrialized […]

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What the AIDS Response Can Teach Us for Addressing COVID

The ways in which epidemics interact with human society suggest that much can be learned from previous epidemics. Drawing on the historical response to the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s, Donald Nicolson describes four parallels between the responses to these outbreaks and suggests what lessons can be learned by public health authorities responding to COVID-19.

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empty classroom

Coronavirus UK – Why Closing Schools is (Generally) a Bad Idea

School closures are widely seen as a quick fix for COVID-19 transmission. The UK government’s resistance to this measure has provoked considerable concern, including a petition to Parliament that has gathered over a half-million signatures at the time of writing. In practice, argues Robert Dingwall, the effects would mainly be risky for children and the consequences would other institutions’ efforts to work as normally as possible.

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Breaking Bad News: How to Talk With the Misinformed

It’s also common to encounter people who are misinformed but don’t know it yet. It’s one thing to double-check your own information, but what’s the best way to talk to someone else about what they think is true – but which is not true?

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Twixt Duck and Rabbit: Psychological Biases and Bad Coronavirus Policy

Crises rarely see human decision-making operating at its best. Politicians and policymakers have to make important decisions in unfamiliar circumstances, with vast gaps in the available information, and all in the full glare of public scrutiny. The psychology of decision making doesn’t just tell us a lot about the potential pitfalls in our own thinking – it alerts us to ways in which some of the world’s governments may go astray.

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Working on laptop on couch

Coronavirus UK: Self-Isolation Must Not Mean Self-Imprisonment

The United Kingdom’s reputed the self-isolation proposal, and its attendant controversy about the alleged influence of social and behavioral scientists on the government’s approach, is a nice indicator of how limited the social science influence actually is – and why it needs to be greater.

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Don’t Tell Me ‘Don’t Panic …’

David Canter considers what panic really is and why its main cause is … telling people not to panic.

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How Coronavirus Became a Political Problem

The Italian government’s decision to expand its lockdown from two small areas of the north to encompass the entire country is a sign of its increasing desperation to control the spread of novel coronavirus. The number of positive cases by the evening of March 9 stood at at least 7,000 with more than 400 people having lost their lives. This has even been described as Italy’s “darkest hour” by Giuseppe Conte, the country’s prime minister.

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Coronavirus, Wuhan, and Social Science

As a social scientist in globalization studies, I am interested in the role some of the less visible layers of globalization — such as awareness of our connections with the lives of people elsewhere — have in shaping our responses, including emotional responses, to global threats, like this one and those to come…

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Coronavirus Impacts

Coping with COVID-19 as a Research Community: The Sussex Hive Experience

When COVID-19 came around, an obvious joke went around in academic circles: PhD students are already isolated, so nothing will change for them. But nothing could be further than the truth. COVID-19 lockdown and university closures mean a big aggravation to the isolation already experienced by researchers.

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seven traits of conspiratorial thinking

Deconstructing ‘Plandemic’: Seven Traits of Conspiratorial Thinking

As scholars who research how to counter science misinformation and conspiracy theories, we believe there is also value in exposing the rhetorical techniques used in the viral video Plandemic. There are seven distinctive traits of conspiratorial thinking. Plandemic offers textbook examples of them all.

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How Will COVID-19 Affect the International Reserve Army of Academic Labor?

Around the world, face-to-face teaching has ceased, campuses are closed and empty, a sudden shift to pervasive online has generated little enthusiasm among students, travel restrictions have drained the lucrative flow of international students to a trickle, and many universities have reported significant financial problems. So what do I do with my freshly minted PhD?

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AI Tool Guides Researchers to Coronavirus Insights

The big idea The scientific community worldwide has mobilized with unprecedented speed to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic, and the emerging […]

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Moving Online Huge Challenge for Kenya’s Higher Education

For over a decade Kenya has made moves towards e-learning for university students. This is all the more important now, as universities have closed indefinitely due to the COVID-19 pandemic. But questions remain as to how effective it is. Jackline Nyerere shares her insights.

0 comments
University students in classroom

Higher Education During COVID and Thereafter: Considerations for India and the Developing World

The current crisis we are encountering, as a result of COVID-19, should enable the appropriation of the current system of delivery and assessment in higher education. Technology integration, undeniably, remains essential for the modernization of education in India and other countries in the developing world. At the same time, such efforts should take into consideration of socio-economic factors, including region-specific issues and student diversity.

0 comments

Gyms, Bars, Cafes– We’ve Lost A Certain Intimacy In Society

Social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic implies many painful losses. Among them are so-called “third places” – the restaurants, bars, […]

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Why Social Science? Because Institutional Racism Exacerbates our Health and Economic Challenges

Social science can help us in addressing racism, much of it unconscious, in our healthcare, employment, housing, banking, education, and criminal justice systems, which will be critical to meeting health and economic challenges going forward.

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solder's temperature checked

The Pandemic Highlights How We Miss Security Threat of Climate Change

With climate change disasters, as with infectious diseases, rapid response time and global coordination are of the essence. At this stage in the COVID-19 situation, there are three primary lessons for a climate-changing future: the immense challenge of global coordination during a crisis, the potential for authoritarian emergency responses, and the spiraling danger of compounding shocks.

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Student Perspectives on the Online Teaching Landscape

Under the threat of coronavirus, many universities took early initiative to empty their campuses and transition to online classroom spaces. […]

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In Indonesia, Social Scientists Could Help in Contact Tracing

While experts in epidemiology are leading the fight against the novel coronavirus, social science researchers can also help make sure contact tracing is carried out in all provinces in Indonesia.

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Do Governments Ever Listen to ‘The Science,’ Or Do They Seek post hoc Fig Leaves?

“Being led by the science” evokes a linear model of policy making which is more a myth than reality. In reality, politicians use claims about scientific knowledge in order to justify a course of action.

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Lack of Data Hampers COVID Predictions, But Models Still Matter

Models are not meant to predict the future perfectly – yet they’re still useful. Biomedical mathematician Lester Caudill, who is currently teaching a class focused on COVID-19 and modeling, explains the limitations of models and how to better understand them.

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Coronavirus UK – Models or Crystal Balls?

As far back as we have records, humans have tried to predict the future. Some societies turned to prayer, divination or oracles. Others to tarot cards or crystal balls. In the modern world, much of that function is fulfilled by mathematical models. Is this new technology of forecasting really an upgrade?

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Our Crisis Fatigue Crisis and the Politics of Coronavirus

After two decades that have almost been defined by wave upon wave of crises, argues Matthew Flinders, it’s possible that the public has simply become immune to warnings from politicians and habitually distrustful of their claims.

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An Open Letter on the COVID-19 Crisis to Young Social Science Scholars

‘I think,’ writes Damon J. Phillips, ‘ that this suggests that you happen to be coming along in a new era that will be stressful to live through, but also one that will fuel the best of our scholarship. In the coming years and decades there will be an urgency around different questions framed by our current crises.’

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Lessons From a Coronavirus Symptom-Tracking App (That’s Free)

“Rather than sending out thousands of online or paper questionnaires, we teamed up with health data science company ZOE to develop a simple symptom-monitoring app called COVIDradar. The app was made from scratch in about four days and would normally take four months. Volunteer citizen scientists use it to report their health status daily and note the appearance of any new symptoms. Once we realized that there was nothing similar available in the UK to monitor symptoms on a population-wide level, we decided to make the app freely available to all.”

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Transportation Research Board Seeks Content on Transport and COVID

Having already released a curated collection of existing conbtent relating to the nexus of pandemics and transportation, the National Academies’ Transportation Research Board is looking for other sources of useful information outside of academic journals.

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Nudge

Coronavirus Crisis Putting UK Nudging to the Test

If the promises of behavioral science can be believed, the UK government’s use of it would potentially minimize economic disruption while still tackling the crisis. This is because, in theory, behavioral science can achieve desirable behaviors without significantly impacting other day-to-day activities. However, the question is whether in practice behavioral science is helping to mitigate disaster.

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Empty university classroom

COVID, the Census, and the Looming University Undercount

Counties with large universities depend heavily on student responses to the decennial census, because the census counts determine the levels of federal funding communities receive. And if those students are counted as being there …?

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Other Coronavirus Resources

General Resources

WHO Coronavirus Information: A fairly comprehensive source for coronavirus related resources: FAQs, travel advice, situation reports, research information.

CDC Coronavirus Information: Another fairly comprehensive source for coronavirus related resources for travelers, business owners and workers, health-care professionals, researchers, schools, and anyone else. This resource also provides information on symptoms, testing, at-risk groups, and the disease at large.

Federation of American Scientists Coronavirus Project: This new initiative of FAS aims to debunk misinformation circulating the web on matters of public health and safety, as well as provide clear and sourced information for policymakers.

List of Federal Agency and Institution COVID-19 Responses: A list of communications and COVID-19 responses from various federal agencies (NIH, Department of Energy, etc.) and various institutions (University of California, State Universities, etc.)

Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center: A website focused on resources addressing the global public health, infectious disease, and emergency preparedness aspects of coronavirus, and includes the renowned COVID-19 spread dashboard.

Coronavirus – The Big Data Response: The SAGE Ocean initiative gathered a collection of resources related to the analysis of COVID-19 data. These include mapping the spread of the virus, GitHub data repositories, some of the datasets currently being used as well as how people are using R and Python to help understand the virus.

Academic Articles on Transportation and Pandemics: The Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, is offering a suite of free articles with insights on public transportation and how pandemics and emergencies affect it.

Interactive Social Distancing Scoreboard: According to the World Health Organization and the CDC, social distancing is currently the most effective way to slow the spread of COVID-19. This interactive scoreboard, updated daily, allows organizations to measure and understand the efficacy of social distancing initiatives at the local level.

Resources for Researchers

COVID-19 Global Research Registry for Public Health and Social Sciences: This is a worldwide registry for the identification of COVID-19-related research and risk reduction efforts. It has been launched by the National Science Foundation-supported CONVERGE facility and the Social Science Extreme Events Research Network in response to a call from the Working Group for Disaster Research at the National Institutes of Health. Registered projects should be focused on topics related to the social and behavioral consequences, policy responses, educational and economic impacts, and public health implications of COVID-19. The form takes approximately 10 minutes to complete. The form is currently available in English, French, and Spanish and will soon be translated to Mandarin Chinese.

Crowdfight COVID-19: This is a service for COVID-19 researchers. They only need to state a wish or a task, which can go from a simple time-intensive task to be performed (e.g. transcribe data, manually annotate images), to answering a technical question which is beyond their expertise, or to setting up a collaboration. They only need to explain their request in a few lines. Then, another scientist makes the effort of understanding that request and making it reality.

COVID-19 International Social Science Research Tracker: A Github-based aggregator begun by Cornell’s Nathan Matias and Facebook’s Alex Leavitt.  This resource is designed to help track new social research about COVID 19, including published findings, pre-prints, projects underway, and projects that are at least at a solid proposal stage.

Doing Fieldwork in a Pandemic: This crowdsourced document initiated by Deborah Lupton helps social researchers who conduct face-to-face fieldwork (interviews, focus groups, participant observation, ethnographies etc) are now faced with the challenge of either delaying or re-inventing their methods so that they can continue their research until social distancing measures are relaxed.

National Institute of Health FAQ on Proposals and Research Awards: This Guide Notice intends to address general questions associated with proposal submission and award management that may arise in relation to COVID-19. NIH is providing this information as a service to applicant and recipient communities in the hopes it will address high-level questions that may arise in this regard.

National Science Foundation FAQ on Proposals and Research Awards: This document addresses questions associated with proposal submission and award management that may arise in relation to COVID-19. NSF is providing this information as a service to proposer and awardee communities in the hope it will address most of the questions that may arise in this regard. More information about the NSF and the coronavirus can be found at the NSF’s coronavirus special report.

Free Medical, Social, and Behavioral Science Articles from SAGE Publishing on Coronavirus and COVID-19: This collection includes the latest medical research from SAGE related to the virus as well as top social and behavioral research to help individuals, communities, and leaders make the best decisions on dealing with the outbreak and its consequences.

Resources for Educators and Students

Free SAGE Publishing Resources to Help Transition to Online Learning: SAGE (parent of Social Science Space) opened access to many resources to help you set up and manage an online course quickly and successfully, at no charge to you or your students.

For authors and early career researchers who are preparing articles for publication in remote and challenging circumstances, SAGE Publishing has a range of resources on its Journals Author Gateway to support you, including: How To Get Published free online courses, webinars, videos, Guides on how to increase the readership of your published research, information on the SAGE Journals Blog, and Advance: A SAGE preprints community

Association of Public & Land-Grant Universities: While it is not an exhaustive list, APLU hopes this list of university communications will help universities in responding to coronavirus and communicating with their campuses.

NAFSA Association of International Educators Coronavirus Critical Resources: NAFSA has assembled resource links to help educators navigate issues arising from the 2019 Novel Coronavirus.

U.S. Department of Education Coronavirus Information: A great source of information about the effort of schools amidst this COVID-19 pandemic. Provides information for schools looking to navigate the current ecosystem.

Resources for Visualizing and Mapping COVID-19 Data

An interactive data dashboard from the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University tracks global COVID-19 cases, deaths and recoveries in real time. All the data is stored on GitHub.

Bing’s COVID-19 tracker combines total global case numbers with the latest news stories from affected countries.

This collection of visuals from Flowing Data helps make sense of coronavirus data: Who is affected, how did it spread, and what can we do.

Data visualization designer Amanda Makulec shares advice to think carefully about how to communicate pandemic data: Visualizations are powerful tools, but in the worst cases can lead to misinformation or incite panic.

Tableau has launched a free resource page featuring data visualizations about the spread of COVID-19 and the public health response.

Our World In Data has aggregated research on COVID-19 helping to make the data understandable and accessible for readers. Graphics illustrate confirmed cases, testing, and containment strategies.

Genomic analysis of the spread of coronavirus: An interactive visualization from Nextstrain.

This epidemic calculator contextualizes COVID-19 numbers and forecasts described in the media, and can help predict the impact of intervention.

To see more, visit SAGE Ocean’s hub for coronavirus data visualization resources.