Coronavirus Impacts

Virtual Festival of Higher Education Looks at British HE post-COVID

The University of Buckingham, in association with the Higher Education Policy Institute, in bringing the fifth festival of Higher Education […]

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Ann Cheney with clinic staff

COVID Can Change How We See and Use Research

In the wake of COVID-19, researchers can become trusted figures of authority who can purposely use their institutional privilege and re-appropriate their research networks, skills and knowledge to better the lives of vulnerable populations during a pandemic.

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warning from 1957 flu epidemic

Coronavirus UK – Could We Live With a ‘Second Influenza’?

Six months into this pandemic, we have learned that it is not going to wipe out human life on this planet. This means, argues Robert Dingwall, that it is time for a public policy reset.

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Conspiracy wall

They Don’t Want You to Know That Not All Conspiracy Theories Should Be Treated the Same

Ever since the coronavirus spread across the world, suspicions have proliferated about what is really going on. Questions arose about […]

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Anthropology Webinars Explore Fieldwork, Public Health, & Coronavirus

In light of the global coronavirus pandemic, anthropologists around the world have been preparing to utilize knowledge gained from past […]

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Bubonic plague in Europe

COVID-19 UK: How Do Pandemics Come to an End?

In the midst of the present chaos, it is easy to forget that the world has had pandemics before and that they have come to an end. Can we learn anything from these experiences that might help us in dealing with COVID-19?

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Coping with COVID-19 as a Research Community: The Sussex Hive Experience

When COVID-19 came around, an obvious joke went around in academic circles: PhD students are already isolated, so nothing will change for them. But nothing could be further than the truth. COVID-19 lockdown and university closures mean a big aggravation to the isolation already experienced by researchers.

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seven traits of conspiratorial thinking

Deconstructing ‘Plandemic’: Seven Traits of Conspiratorial Thinking

As scholars who research how to counter science misinformation and conspiracy theories, we believe there is also value in exposing the rhetorical techniques used in the viral video Plandemic. There are seven distinctive traits of conspiratorial thinking. Plandemic offers textbook examples of them all.

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How Will COVID-19 Affect the International Reserve Army of Academic Labor?

Around the world, face-to-face teaching has ceased, campuses are closed and empty, a sudden shift to pervasive online has generated little enthusiasm among students, travel restrictions have drained the lucrative flow of international students to a trickle, and many universities have reported significant financial problems. So what do I do with my freshly minted PhD?

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AI Tool Guides Researchers to Coronavirus Insights

The big idea The scientific community worldwide has mobilized with unprecedented speed to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic, and the emerging […]

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Moving Online Huge Challenge for Kenya’s Higher Education

For over a decade Kenya has made moves towards e-learning for university students. This is all the more important now, as universities have closed indefinitely due to the COVID-19 pandemic. But questions remain as to how effective it is. Jackline Nyerere shares her insights.

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University students in classroom

Higher Education During COVID and Thereafter: Considerations for India and the Developing World

The current crisis we are encountering, as a result of COVID-19, should enable the appropriation of the current system of delivery and assessment in higher education. Technology integration, undeniably, remains essential for the modernization of education in India and other countries in the developing world. At the same time, such efforts should take into consideration of socio-economic factors, including region-specific issues and student diversity.

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Gyms, Bars, Cafes– We’ve Lost A Certain Intimacy In Society

Social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic implies many painful losses. Among them are so-called “third places” – the restaurants, bars, […]

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Why Social Science? Because Institutional Racism Exacerbates our Health and Economic Challenges

Social science can help us in addressing racism, much of it unconscious, in our healthcare, employment, housing, banking, education, and criminal justice systems, which will be critical to meeting health and economic challenges going forward.

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solder's temperature checked

The Pandemic Highlights How We Miss Security Threat of Climate Change

With climate change disasters, as with infectious diseases, rapid response time and global coordination are of the essence. At this stage in the COVID-19 situation, there are three primary lessons for a climate-changing future: the immense challenge of global coordination during a crisis, the potential for authoritarian emergency responses, and the spiraling danger of compounding shocks.

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Student Perspectives on the Online Teaching Landscape

Under the threat of coronavirus, many universities took early initiative to empty their campuses and transition to online classroom spaces. […]

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In Indonesia, Social Scientists Could Help in Contact Tracing

While experts in epidemiology are leading the fight against the novel coronavirus, social science researchers can also help make sure contact tracing is carried out in all provinces in Indonesia.

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Do Governments Ever Listen to ‘The Science,’ Or Do They Seek post hoc Fig Leaves?

“Being led by the science” evokes a linear model of policy making which is more a myth than reality. In reality, politicians use claims about scientific knowledge in order to justify a course of action.

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Lack of Data Hampers COVID Predictions, But Models Still Matter

Models are not meant to predict the future perfectly – yet they’re still useful. Biomedical mathematician Lester Caudill, who is currently teaching a class focused on COVID-19 and modeling, explains the limitations of models and how to better understand them.

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Coronavirus UK – Models or Crystal Balls?

As far back as we have records, humans have tried to predict the future. Some societies turned to prayer, divination or oracles. Others to tarot cards or crystal balls. In the modern world, much of that function is fulfilled by mathematical models. Is this new technology of forecasting really an upgrade?

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Our Crisis Fatigue Crisis and the Politics of Coronavirus

After two decades that have almost been defined by wave upon wave of crises, argues Matthew Flinders, it’s possible that the public has simply become immune to warnings from politicians and habitually distrustful of their claims.

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An Open Letter on the COVID-19 Crisis to Young Social Science Scholars

‘I think,’ writes Damon J. Phillips, ‘ that this suggests that you happen to be coming along in a new era that will be stressful to live through, but also one that will fuel the best of our scholarship. In the coming years and decades there will be an urgency around different questions framed by our current crises.’

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Lessons From a Coronavirus Symptom-Tracking App (That’s Free)

“Rather than sending out thousands of online or paper questionnaires, we teamed up with health data science company ZOE to develop a simple symptom-monitoring app called COVIDradar. The app was made from scratch in about four days and would normally take four months. Volunteer citizen scientists use it to report their health status daily and note the appearance of any new symptoms. Once we realized that there was nothing similar available in the UK to monitor symptoms on a population-wide level, we decided to make the app freely available to all.”

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Transportation Research Board Seeks Content on Transport and COVID

Having already released a curated collection of existing conbtent relating to the nexus of pandemics and transportation, the National Academies’ Transportation Research Board is looking for other sources of useful information outside of academic journals.

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Nudge

Coronavirus Crisis Putting UK Nudging to the Test

If the promises of behavioral science can be believed, the UK government’s use of it would potentially minimize economic disruption while still tackling the crisis. This is because, in theory, behavioral science can achieve desirable behaviors without significantly impacting other day-to-day activities. However, the question is whether in practice behavioral science is helping to mitigate disaster.

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Empty university classroom

COVID, the Census, and the Looming University Undercount

Counties with large universities depend heavily on student responses to the decennial census, because the census counts determine the levels of federal funding communities receive. And if those students are counted as being there …?

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